Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Using the Bible as a Mideast 'Road Map'

June 22, 2003

In "Some Christians See a 'Road Map' to End Times" (Commentary, June 18), Darrell Bock appears to conclude that peace between Israel and the Palestinians is impossible. He states that almost all conservative Christians wonder "whether any agreement can be signed that will truly give Israel peace."

The problem with religious fundamentalism of any stripe is that it tends to be immune to reason. Taking a literal interpretation of Bible prophecy overlooks the central theme of the book: respect for human life made in the image of God. The abuses of human rights by both sides in this conflict are not even addressed. The suicide bombings by the Arabs and the targeted killings and home demolitions by Israel must be loudly protested by all people of goodwill. Both sides need to stop killing each other and to address each other's legitimate grievances. The "best advice of all" is not to simply live "faithful, Christian lives" and ignore the crimes being committed by both Israel and the Palestinians.

Richard Fitzgerald

Long Beach

*

Neither of the New Testament passages Bock mentions (Romans 11 and Acts 3:18-22) refers to the land or to people being blessed or cursed depending on how they view Israel. What Romans 11 does say is that the real "Israel" consists of both Jews and Gentiles who follow the Messiah. However, his conclusion is excellent: Stop trying to orchestrate the "end times" and start living faithful, Christian lives.

Marilyn McGinnis

Glendale

*

Do those of us who do not believe in the mystical dreams of Middle Eastern shepherds from 2,000 years ago still have to put up with the wars, death and killings being committed for the sake of religion in that sad part of the world? I am sure that the mothers of the recently slain Palestinian and Israeli children would gladly forsake spiritual violence condoned and financed by overseas zealots in return for a secular peace.

Eric Parish

Vista

*

All you do by printing the narrow opinions of the likes of Bock is precipitate the conviction among literal-minded Christians that the fictions of the Bible have some grounding in fact. Next time, why not have some literary scholar comment on the situation in the Middle East from the Harry Potter perspective? The point would be just about as relevant to what's really happening as was Bock's.

Paul Vandeventer

Los Angeles

*

Bock's assessment of conservative Christian involvement in and interpretation of the current events in the Middle East is exactly why the U.S. Constitution separates church and state.

Edward Saade

Poway

*

According to Bock's article, we Americans, at least some of us, are viewing Middle East events through a biblical lens. We same Americans are trying to establish a secular government in Iraq and are against the Islamic Republic of Iran. Are we serious? I wonder, what is the percentage of Americans who would like to see a Christian United States of America in the 21st century?

Ergun Kunter

Irvine

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|