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Low-Cost Fund-Raisers Have Little Trickle-Down Effect

June 23, 2003

Re "Bush Dives Into Race With $3.5-Million Event," June 18: The Bush administration encourages Americans to use their recent tax cuts to spend their way back to economic prosperity. I wouldn't say that is what George W. Bush is adhering to with his election campaign launch. Although his campaign may now take in donations from individuals that double the figure allowed in previous elections, food and services at his fund-raising dinners are being scaled back to stand-up hamburger and hot dog snacks, in lieu of full catered affairs with seating at tables, to maximize the income generated.

Whereas, in the past, dozens of restaurant staff members and food suppliers had the benefit of income provided by such affairs, now less employee support is needed. No waiters, fewer bartenders, less staff to service tables, less food to be provided by companies, fewer dishwashers, etc. -- these are missed opportunities to stimulate the economy in just the manner the administration hopes to.

Just as the wealthy will enjoy their tax-cut-induced profits with probably little change in their spending habits, so the Bush campaign will take in more money while spending less and keeping more for itself.

Peggy Anderson

Long Beach

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Why is President Bush such a remarkable fund-raiser? Folks, it's the tax cut that favors the rich. It's payback time. Such an elegant scheme, created by the controlling powers, who couldn't care less about its perfidious nature. The similarity to kickbacks in the contracting world, which land people in jail, is obvious, but sometimes it seems a crime can be just too big to bother with.

Edward Hujsak

La Jolla

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Bush's big fund-raiser reminds us that his tax cuts are already having an effect on one part of the economy. Though they do not seem to be leading to increased jobs or a better life for the majority of us, wealthier Americans will be reminded who their benefactor is when it comes time to make political donations. And Republican campaign workers, ad writers and political operatives will see a better standard of living and be able to contribute to the economy.

Donald Schwartz

Los Angeles

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