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VIEWPOINT LETTERS

So Much Baseball, So Little Objectivity

October 11, 2003

After the Red Sox outfielders collided in Monday night's game, the Fox announcers said, "It's so hard to watch." In spite of the difficulty, Fox showed the collision over and over again. Let's see the bull gore the matador, the race driver hit the wall, the quarterback's leg snapped. Let's see what's so hard to watch again and again. It sells beer and cars and is right behind a filmed drive-by shooting.

That's sports, folks.

David Eggenschwiler

Los Angeles

*

With all the broadcasters out there, why are we forced to listen to Steve Lyons on Fox? Couldn't they find someone else without all the opinions? In the future Lyons, keep your pants on, and your opinions to yourself. And Fox, think twice about who you hire.

Bill Osborn

Palmdale

Editor's note: As a player for the Chicago White Sox in 1990, Lyons, after sliding into first base during a game at Detroit, got up, unbuckled his belt, dropped his pants and, wearing a supporter over long johns, bent over to brush some dirt from his legs.

*

Anyone who caught a game during the Cubs-Braves series called by Giant announcers Jon Miller and Joe Morgan had to be more than a little amused by the Giants' being dispatched in four games after listening to these two deliver backhanded compliments and barely muted slights toward the Cubs throughout. Their transformation from a credible team into Braves' apologists made me ill.

Craig Geber

Torrance

*

Let's make one thing perfectly clear before we anoint Barry Bonds as the greatest baseball player of all time. Until Bonds passes at least one random test for steroids, his name should be kept out of the loop.

Brian Kowalchuk

Los Angeles

*

I was driving in my car listening to Game 1 between the Yankees and Twins. During the seventh-inning stretch the public address announcer asked that everyone bow their heads in a moment of silence and remember the men and women of the United States armed services, serving around the world protecting "our freedoms." This was followed by a stirring rendition of "God Bless America." I think this practice should stop.

I love America. I treasure the freedoms that we enjoy, but the playoffs, and sports in general, are not the time or place to be stuffing America's patriotism down the throats of the world. Remember, we named it the "World" Series. We've invited everyone to watch, listen and cheer, regardless of where they are from or what their beliefs may be. Let's don't become that snob that everyone puts up with but nobody likes.

Chad Starbuck

Santa Monica

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