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Los Angeles | Steve Harvey / ONLY IN L.A.

Students Learn That Some Skills Serve Them Well in a Variety of Professions

October 21, 2003|Steve Harvey

The L.A. City Council's ban on lap dancing has angered many practitioners of the up-close-and-personal art form, including one who told the L.A. Independent newspaper that many of her colleagues are students, some in medical school. The medical school connection makes sense. Both professions, I imagine, require a good bedside manner.

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Unrapid transit: My colleague, Raoul Ranoa, noticed a sign that was apparently intended for jurors but was misspelled -- and later altered to apply to another type of stubborn beast (see photo).

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Unclear on the concept: Paul Stemmler of Torrance found a shrubbery warning that puzzles me, unless there's been a problem in the parking lot with high-jumpers and pole vaulters (see photo).

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Guide to adventurous dining: Thomas Edwards of L.A. spotted what appears to be an underground restaurant, at least when it comes to the entrees (see photo). Not sure if a la carte is served above ground or what.

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The fastest gun in L.A.: When I heard that one of the historic documents going on display at the Central Library was an arrest warrant for Wyatt Earp, I wondered if it concerned an obscure period of his career -- his card-playing days in old Los Angeles.

But Diane Siegel, an educational specialist for the "Treasures from the National Archives" exhibit, told me the warrant was issued in 1871 in Indian Territory outside Arkansas, when Earp was a young man. He was wanted in connection with a horse-stealing incident.

Forty years later, Earp -- then 62 -- was arrested in L.A. along with two other men and arraigned "for operating a bunco game" at the Auditorium Hotel near Pershing Square, author Glenn G. Boyer wrote.

Earp, who at first told police his name was William Stapp, was "absolved of complicity," Boyer wrote, adding that it's possible Earp "innocently strolled onto the scene where a couple of men, possibly his acquaintances, were running their racket."

As for the 1871 horse-stealing warrant, that case was also dropped against Earp. I doubt if he was obliged to mention the incident on subsequent job applications.

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miscelLAny: Court reporter Ira Newlander heard a deposition in which a witness, testifying on behalf of an engineering consultant, said the latter bills clients in much the same way a lawyer does.

Questioning attorney: "I see."

Witness: "Except a lot lower."

Attorney: "That's unfortunate for him."

Witness: "That's what he keeps telling me."

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Steve Harvey can be reached at (800) LA-TIMES, Ext. 77083, by fax at (213) 237-4712, by mail at Metro, L.A. Times, 202 W. 1st St., L.A. 90012 and by e-mail at steve.harvey@latimes.com.

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