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Grocery Dispute: What Do Workers Get in the Bargain?

October 26, 2003

It is disturbing to read and hear that many people do not support the grocery workers on strike because their medical insurance isn't as good as that of the strikers. The object of bargaining is not to sink to the lowest but to aspire to the highest.

Estelle Waslosky

Brea

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Steve A. Bard and grocery executives spare no expense to show me how stubborn they can be. Five full-page ads in Sunday's paper, free food and slashed prices. They can give away the store. My family will not come back to shop until the employees welcome us back with their usual warm, friendly smiles.

Joanne G. Landeros

Dana Point

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It's interesting that new employees at the supermarket only needed a day or two of training to do the jobs of these highly paid strikers.

These "skilled" workers got over $17 an hour, double time Sundays and triple time on holidays. The average schoolteacher doesn't make that much.

Many of us in California are unemployed, so the strikers ought to consider themselves lucky to have jobs and not jeopardize them by striking. Do the math -- determine how long after the strike your incomes will catch up to offset what you will have lost during the strike. It may be several years, if at all.

Ray Uhler

Tustin

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I ask my neighbors and recent ranting letter scribes to stop and think. Since when did it become an inalienable right to dash out for brie at two in the morning? We gave the folks who tend our lawn and garden a raise. How about the folks that provide us with a variety of products that are the envy of the world?

Tom Sloss

Fountain Valley

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