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LETTERS

A funny tension

September 28, 2003

In her otherwise fine article on the longevity of "Frasier" ("Cheers to the Long Run," Sept. 21), Barbara Isenberg overlooked a key reason for the two-year decline in the show's appeal and why the writers now face "the extra challenge of restoring some of the diminished luster."

That luster began to diminish when the producers decided to resolve the sexual tension between Niles and Daphne. Niles' unrequited love led to many hilarious situations, giving the show an edge that vanished when he became Daphne's fawning, obsequious sweetheart. The producers should have learned from the experiences of "Wings" and "Caroline in the City." When the antagonists became protagonists, the sexual tension disappeared and the shows tanked.

Forrest G. Wood

Bakersfield

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