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This Venturi Tradition Is Unlike Any Other

March 13, 2004

Ken Venturi, for years television's most inarticulate commentator, alleges in his new book that Arnold Palmer cheated to win the 1958 Masters. There is an axiom that when you shoot at a king, you'd better not miss.

Venturi and Palmer were playing together when the incident occurred. Venturi claims he told Palmer that his scorecard was incorrect. Palmer, obviously not in agreement, signed it anyway. Venturi then also signed the "incorrect" card because he "didn't want to further damage his image."

Who is more credible, one who signs a card believing it is correct, or one who, out of self-interest, signs it knowing it isn't? Moreover, how trustworthy is someone who is throwing in a little controversy to help peddle an autobiography that he lacked the capacity to write?

As Venturi the wordsmith himself once uttered during a telecast when a rules question arose: "It all depends on how you interpretate the rule."

It remains clear that Arnold Palmer is still the king. Venturi's shot missed.

Bart Robertson

Torrance

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