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Danish Disdain of 'Mixed' Marriages

September 11, 2004

Denmark's ostracism of culturally mixed couples is clearly racist and xenophobic (" 'Love's Refugees' Feel Betrayed by Denmark," Sept. 6). Or, at least, it appears racist and xenophobic to today's politically correct U.S. readers. However, there is another context in which this ostracism can be considered: a Europe that demographic projections show will have a Muslim majority within 50 years. This, even in the context of today's largely secular Europe, represents a societal change of cataclysmic proportions. "Traditional values" in Europe are historically based on Christian values, which are hugely at odds even with mainstream Islamic values. Clearly some Danes have decided that political correctness is not working in their country's best interest.

Richard Brodie

Pacific Palisades

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Surely a liberal country such as Denmark couldn't possibly have a more mean-spirited immigration policy than the U.S.? Just wait and see, my wife opined over a year ago. In 1982, I married the well-known Danish journalist and writer Merete von Eyben, convincing her and her daughter, Rie, to emigrate and become alien residents here. In 2000, Merete was granted a PhD from UCLA for her dissertation on Karen Michaelis, the Danish author, which was subsequently published. In 2001, Rie was awarded a master's degree, also at UCLA. I have never applied for residency in Denmark, except for a six-month extended stay in 1982. It leaves a bitter taste to now be told we can come only as tourists. After having contributed to an increased awareness of Danish culture and literature, I am now categorized as persona non grata for residency.

F. Daniel Gray

Los Angeles

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