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Capsules | SUPPLEMENTS

Sweeping claims for antioxidant

September 13, 2004|Elena Conis

Microhydrin, created by American inventor and doctor Patrick Flanagan, is a pricey supplement (bottles of 60 capsules sell for $35 to $50 or more) touted by some online and mail-order retailers as one of the most powerful antioxidants on the market. The supplement contains silicate minerals found in so-called Hunza water, which trickles through the mountains inhabited by the long-living Hunza people of northern Pakistan.

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Uses: The supplement is taken to prevent dehydration, muscle soreness and exhaustion after physical exercise; to protect against the effects of aging; and to fight off heart disease, cancer, gum disease and diabetes, among other conditions.

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Friday September 17, 2004 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 1 inches; 40 words Type of Material: Correction
Supplement -- An article in Monday's Health section said the supplement Microhydrin was created by American inventor and doctor Patrick Flanagan. Flanagan created an earlier version of the product, but he did not create the formula currently marketed as Microhydrin.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Monday September 20, 2004 Home Edition Health Part F Page 6 Features Desk 1 inches; 42 words Type of Material: Correction
Supplement -- An article in the Sept. 13 Health section said the supplement Microhydrin was created by American inventor and doctor Patrick Flanagan. Flanagan created an earlier version of the product, but he did not create the formula currently marketed as Microhydrin.

Dose: Two to four 600-milligram capsules a day.

Precautions: Because Microhydrin has not been widely studied, little is known about possible side effects.

Research: Microhydrin's manufacturers say the supplement provides the body with negative hydrogen ions that help boost energy and improve nutrient absorption and hydration. Most scientists say there is little scientific evidence for such claims.

Dietary supplement makers are not required by the U.S. government to demonstrate that their products are safe or effective. Ask your healthcare provider for advice on selecting a brand.

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-- Elena Conis

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