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THE SCOUT

A new leaf

January 19, 2006|David A. Keeps | Times Staff Writer

"PEOPLE have always been attracted to the sculptural quality of my work and asked if there was some way to make them last forever," says florist Krislyn Meyer Komarov, below, who has used preserved mosses and leaves to create sculpture for Madonna's parties and who will stage an after-Grammy event for Warner Bros. Instead of silk flowers, "which don't have very much soul," she fills birch shells with colorful mosses and stones, and she stuffs balsa wood pods, $35, with beans and paper flowers. "Japanese Dream," which features orange reindeer moss dripping from sandblasted birch (see F1), and "Raining on Tuesday," above, a manzanita branch strung with blue glass, are priced from $400 -- costly for a flower arrangement, but a bargain for botanical artwork that will last for years. Krislyn Custom Floral Couture, 6910 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles; (323) 692-7862; www.krislyndesign.com.

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FINDS

It's an honor just to be sitting here

Craig Olsen believes that everyone should take awards season sitting down. In the spirit of the Golden Globes, the co-owner of Bamboo Colony has designed a trophy throne he calls the Knox, a square-tufted armchair covered in gilded leather. "Driving down Melrose I've been seeing so many women carrying gold bags," Olsen says. "I think furniture follows fashion. If you're wearing it now, you should be sitting on it next season." The Knox is a sexy unisex seat that marries the made-for-a-mogul proportions of a cube chair with dark maple or clear acrylic legs. It's $1,995 and available in four- to six-week delivery -- just in time for the Oscars. 7525 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles; (323) 549-0400, www.bamboocolony.com.

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SCENE

Beyond Sundance and snow in Utah

You don't have to go skiing or to the Sundance Film Festival to stop and shop in Salt Lake City, a surprising resource for 20th century design.

For film geeks: At Object, proprietor Scott Stiefel focuses on Machine Age arts: graphic novels, illustrations from 1910 to 1950, and vintage film and radio gear. "Poster Art: The Sundance Vision," an exhibition of graphics from festival films dating to the mid-1980s, opens tomorrow. Among the items for sale are four-sheets of recent hits including "Napoleon Dynamite" ($30? Sweet!) and rarities including an original "Maria Full of Grace" one-sheet ($250) and a "Blue Velvet" poster autographed by director David Lynch ($1,650). (801) 328-2306, www.object-gallery.com.

For midcentury freaks: Seeking affordable '50s and '60s furnishings? Check out the Green Ant, the best resource in the city for Scandinavian Modern, midcentury American classics by Herman Miller and Knoll, and designs by Paul McCobb and Verner Panton. (801) 595-1818, www.thegreenant.com.

For shabby chic: European antiques, rustic decor and ethnic pieces clog the halls of Salt Lake Antiques. Ask the owners about the stocked-to-the-rafters annex in an abandoned factory. (801) 322-1273.

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HOME PAGES

Hold on to those sweet dreams

Hold Everything is about to live up to its name. The company, a division of Williams-Sonoma, announced last week that it was shuttering its stores and planned to put its catalog and website offerings on permanent hold by the end of the year. That's a darn shame, because the operation that made its name producing bins and baskets recently started producing stuff to put inside those storage units. A debut collection of linens that includes the 200-thread-count cotton percale Signature Border duvet cover and shams ($20 to $108) and the Honeycomb Floral sheet sets (from $88), shown here in pale shades of pink, green and taupe, are being promoted with free shipping through March 27. The collection has a crisp Lilly Pulitzer modern look that works equally well in shabby chic or boutique-hotel-style boudoirs. For more information or to order, go to www.holdeverything.com.

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