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One woman, many voices

In a multicharacter solo show, Sarah Jones gently prods at controversial ideas.

March 05, 2006|Patrick Pacheco | Special to The Times

Not all critics love them as much, however. Clive Barnes, writing in the conservative New York Post, called the show "high-octane political correctness taken to flaming heights," which brings up the notion that Jones may just be preaching to the choir. She says she can't be bothered with sussing out who comes to her show and why. But she hopes "Bridge & Tunnel" will be challenging across the political spectrum.

"I think we all need to be challenged," she says. "I think liberal guilt is utterly useless, a placeholder for incredibly weighty baggage that bogs you down. The best thing you can do is just accept accountability in your own life as much as you can."

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Tuesday March 07, 2006 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 0 inches; 27 words Type of Material: Correction
Sarah Jones -- An article on "Bridge & Tunnel" actress Sarah Jones in Sunday Calendar incorrectly referred to Steve Colman as Jones' fiance. He is her husband.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday March 12, 2006 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 0 inches; 28 words Type of Material: Correction
Sarah Jones -- An article in Calendar on March 5 about "Bridge & Tunnel" actress Sarah Jones referred to Steve Colman as Jones' fiance. He is her husband.

Holding citizenry to account in an age of "truthiness," as comic Stephen Colbert puts it, is what Jones says is her ultimate goal. She laughs when it's suggested that her future work may be more hard-hitting. "Oh, my, one project at a time, please."

But, she adds, "I don't want to ever compromise the truth, no matter how ugly the encounter. I think people can handle it, analyze it, and work it out for themselves, wherever they find themselves, politically, socially and economically. That's what America is all about. It's not all going to be sugarcoated, but I think it's going to be an overwhelmingly pleasurable experience -- because connecting to another human being always is."

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