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Sculpting his steely vision

Art

Richard Serra is allied with the alloy, using it in tilting, curving forms that have gained admiration throughout the world and now are showing up more often in California.

March 26, 2006|Suzanne Muchnic | Times Staff Writer

And there seems to be no shortage of work. A major Serra sculpture composed of four walk-through spherical sections was installed in a prominent position at the Toronto airport about six months ago, but it won't go on view until construction of the terminal is finished. The UC San Francisco Medical Center's new Mission Bay campus also has a Serra awaiting public unveiling. Seizing an opportunity to honor a native son, Chancellor J. Michael Bishop spearheaded a drive to acquire a Serra for the main pedestrian entrance to the campus. It consists of two 60-foot-tall steel plates placed about 300 feet apart.

Yet another work, for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is under discussion. But at the moment, Serra is concentrating on the retrospective at MoMA. It will contain only about 20 pieces, he said, but many of them are enormous. Surveying four decades, the works will fill two floors of temporary exhibition space and spill out into the garden.

So with all that going on, what's he doing in his spare time?

"Basically I've been doing a lot of pool therapy," he said. "I am swimming. I'm better, but not all better. In another month, I'll be all better."

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