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Other programs about 9/11

September 09, 2006|Samantha Bonar

"Trapped in the Towers," today, 8 p.m., A&E A heart-stopping, stomach-twisting tale of the survival of six individuals trapped in elevators in the World Trade Center towers after they were hit by planes on 9/11. "When I went into the elevator, it was one world ... and when I came out of the elevator, everything had changed," says one survivor. "You look for the meaning; I'm not sure I've found it yet."

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"9/11," Sunday, 8 p.m., CBS The multi-award-winning eyewitness view of the attack by French filmmakers Jules and Gedeon Naudet, originally broadcast six months after the attack, has been updated with follow-up interviews with firefighters. Nothing can compare to the shock of this original, on-site footage by two brothers who were in the right place at the wrong time -- filming a documentary about a rookie firefighter -- and ended up following firefighters into ground zero. Yes, there are some pretty bad words in this one, but all in all they seem appropriate. So if you are going to cover your ears, you might as well cover your eyes.

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"Brothers Lost: Stories of 9/11," Monday, 7 p.m., Cinemax This heart-wrenching documentary features interviews with 31 men who lost their brothers in the twin tower attack and explores the deep nature of the fraternal bond. Filmmaker Sean McGinly lost his own brother in one of the towers.

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"America Rebuilds II: Return to Ground Zero," Monday, 9 p.m., PBS The documentary picks up where Part I left off (in May 2002), with rebuilding on the site still uncertain.

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"9/11: The Day That Changed America," Monday, 10 p.m., MSNBC "Hardball" host Chris Matthews interviews journalists, pundits and government muckety-mucks about their memories of the day of the attack. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell's comments are shockingly trite.

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"Dust to Dust: The Health Effects of 9/11," Monday, 10 p.m., Sundance Channel After watching this documentary, you may wish ill upon then-EPA chief Christine Whitman. The courts are already on it -- a judge has ruled that Whitman can be held personally responsible in a class-action lawsuit for her misleading statements about what was in fact an incredibly toxic cloud of asbestos, benzene, lead, mercury and other carcinogens.

-- Samantha Bonar

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