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Nuclear hypocrisy

August 05, 2007

Re "India, U.S. reach nuclear accord," July 28

Glaringly absent from the Bush administration's account of the nuclear deal with India is any mention of North Korea or Iran. By legitimizing India's refusal to sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, the U.S. is sending one of two messages to the leadership of both nations: Either the United States is employing a double standard, or it is willing to accept a nation's nuclear capability 10 years after the fact. Surely the administration did not intend to send either message.

Zaahira Suhail Wyne

Fredericksburg, Va.

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Re "The mirage of nuclear power," Opinion, July 30

Paul Josephson should first check with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power to see how farfetched his arguments are about the "mirage" of nuclear power. The lowest cost clean power (10%) delivered to the customers of the city of L.A. is from the Palo Verde Nuclear Power facility in Arizona. He speaks of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl incidents that occurred almost 30 years ago but does not mention the 103 nuclear reactor plants that have been operating safely and economically throughout the U.S. for 40-plus years, providing up to 20% of the power in some East Coast states. He writes about the French experience but fails to mention that it has the cheapest energy costs and the cleanest air in Europe -- 85% of its power is from nuclear facilities, and it also exports electricity to its neighbors. He comments about nuclear aircraft but fails to mention the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered ships and submarines that have operated without problems throughout the world for decades. It is unfortunate that a teacher of history would be so irresponsible in his assessment of the industry.

Joe Vitti

Granada Hills

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Josephson -- not a nuclear engineer or scientist but a historian -- warns us that the sky is falling and nuclear energy is the cause. France (what does it know that we don't?) now has nearly 90% of its electrical energy produced by controlled fission reactors -- not by oil or coal, which, unlike reactors, increase the greenhouse gases by huge amounts and cause pollution. Certainly our oil supplies from the Middle East are problematic. For nearly four decades, France has gotten more than two-thirds of its electrical energy from reactors -- with not one accident. If the French can do it, why can't we? It can be done here. Oui.

Devon Showley

Cypress

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