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The fight over Home Depot

August 19, 2007

Re "Home Depot loses store permit battle," Aug. 16

One really has to wonder why Home Depot would resort to a threatened lawsuit against the city as its latest ploy to force itself where it is not wanted. If it truly believed that its presence in Sunland-Tujunga was such a good thing, then why has it resisted with everything it could think of, and afford, to submit to the requested and required environmental review? My guess is that it didn't think it could pass.

As a resident of that community, I have deep concerns about what this project would do to my neighborhood (and the value of my home) and the irreparable damage it would cause to our bucolic, semirural environment. Once it is destroyed, it can never be brought back.

Marcus Dodell

Tujunga

To those who feel sorry for Home Depot: Did one of its lobbyists hit you with a 2-by-4? I understand the city is a bureaucracy, but Home Depot is a $90-billion company. By starting work on this project, it knew it was going to ask for forgiveness rather than receive permission. Home Depot's corporate mantra is to take no prisoners and, by all means, continue growing. But if it didn't want to play by the rules, there are plenty of other businesses that could generate similar tax revenues, provide jobs and be willing to work with the neighbors who must live with it every day.

Jim McGlynn

Tujunga

If Sunland-Tujunga residents are so concerned about the extra traffic that a proposed Home Depot would attract, why have they kept silent the last few years as dozens of homes have been torn down and replaced by condominiums? Do condo owners not drive?

Steve Thompson

La Crescenta

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