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Clothes make the person

August 24, 2007

Re "The false modesty movement," Opinion, Aug. 21

Anne K. Ream seems to equate the movement toward modest clothing and chaste behavior with a loss of the societal and employment gains achieved by women over the last 30 years. If anything, it is objectification of women fostered by today's revealing clothing that limits progress. Which shows more self-assurance -- a woman who dresses fashionably but modestly, or one who flaunts her body?

I have a 15-year-old daughter who insists on wearing modest clothing yet sees the world as full of opportunity. She played baseball with the boys all the way through Little League and enjoys backpacking, rock climbing and theater. She does well in school and is preparing herself for college. My daughter is not alone. We should encourage our young women and men who want to dress modestly, live chastely and dare to conquer life's challenges. The world will be better because of them.

Dave Ball

Sunnyvale

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It seems to me that, in those societies with clothing restrictions for women, men have a very low opinion of themselves: "We know we have no self-control when it comes to females, so we'll just hide them so we are not tempted."

Charlene A. Scherer

Rancho Mirage

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Freudian psychology aside, conservative and well-arranged dress conveys a more positive impression. What comes to mind when anyone sees faddish or revealing clothes? An immature person may think that is cool, and that is what fashion designers capitalize on to make a fast buck. Designers create outlandish clothes, celebrities wear them, and the rest spend money because they have to wear the latest trend. The objective is to be noticed -- see how shocking they can be and how far they can go. That certainly doesn't show maturity or soundness of mind.

Grace Hampton

Burbank

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