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'Kid Nation' delivered; Will Smith is 'Legend'

December 09, 2007|Deborah Netburn

You should talk about: The inaugural "Kid Nation" coming to an end. It was one of our two most anticipated new fall shows and the only one that delivered on its promise. (We stopped watching "Pushing Daisies" after the second episode. Too precious!) Along the way we fell in love with Laurel, felt like screaming at Taylor and thanked God for Sophia. We've heard another "Kid Nation" is in the works, but we know it will never be the same. (Wednesday)

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You will talk about: "I Am Legend." We're going to go out on a limb and award best trailer of the year to this terrifying-looking film starring Will Smith as the last person alive in New York City. That part where he curls up in the bathtub with his dog to await the long and dangerous night? Scary in the most horrible way. We hear on good authority that if you like unbearable tension in your movies, this is your film. (Friday)

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You could talk about: "Party Mamas." The extravagant children's birthday party is a perennially interesting story. It gets written by every publication every five years or so and is always a good read -- $30,000 for a 5-year-old's baseball-themed party? Tell me more! Well, We TV has put together a 12-episode series called "Party Mamas" that vilifies obsessive parents who spend unfathomable amounts on their offspring's parties. For more proof that rich people are monsters, tune in this week. (Wednesday)

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Who knew you could talk about: The History Channel's video games. Historically accurate video games? Hey, why not! This week the History Channel releases "History Channel: Battle for the Pacific" for PlayStation 3, which allows participants to play as American or Japanese soldiers, and fight from Henderson Field in Guadalcanal through the Philippines to Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. Each level begins with a documentary showing real battle footage. (Tuesday)

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We think it's worth talking about: "Youth Without Youth." Francis Ford Coppola's latest film is based on the novella by Mircea Eliade -- a philosopher we remember reading in college. (Fellow religion majors may remember "The Sacred and the Profane.") The book (and presumably the film) is about an aging academic sought by the Nazis after he experiences some major event that makes him extra smart. We think the title sounds like an old man's wishful thinking. Is that mean? (Friday)

-- Deborah Netburn

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