Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

STYLE SCOUT

They Must Obey

December 09, 2007

THE days of Shepard Fairey as an outsider artist are long gone. We didn't need to bump up against the two burly bouncers at his gallery opening last week to know that. Fairey, who started in the 1990s with his anonymous "Obey Giant" sticker campaign, now has his own clothing line, his own magazine (Swindle) and a legion of fans of his fashionably political propaganda art.

Skate rats, street taggers, actors and liberal-minded art collectors came out for the guest-list-only affair, the premiere of "Imperfect Union," his exhibition of new antiwar works at the Merry Karnowsky Gallery. They sipped vodka cranberrys and mingled in a re-creation of Fairey's studio -- stencils, 7-Eleven Big Gulp sodas and all. And, of course, the silk-screened prints sold like hot cakes.

Although the rainy weather was cause to pull out some weightier pieces, most gallery-goers went light on the designer labels, opting instead for quirky garage sale finds and street wear brands.

Guys showed their support for Fairey's military-minded message by wearing parkas or vintage wool pea coats with dark jeans from the artist's Obey clothing line. Some mixed things up with 1940s-style fedoras from Ben Sherman. Designer Brandon Schoolhouse added bling to his casual Puma track jacket by piling on a fistful of rings from his jewelry line Han Cholo.

Women layered dresses and skirts over thick tights, sporting drapy scarves or wearing shrunken leather jackets and high boots with slip dresses. And if you thought leggings were over, think again. They were out in full force and actually looked fresh under vintage frocks with ballet flats or ankle booties. Photographer Abbey Drucker was the most faithful to the 1980s heritage, wearing her leggings with a loose black blouse that she said was "vintage Guess." An ironically chic statement if ever there was one.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|