Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections
(Page 3 of 3)

Lee Hazlewood, talkin' before it's sundown

January 21, 2007|Richard Cromelin | Times Staff Writer

There was sexual tension to spare in her biggest hit, which Hazlewood had written as a "party song," inspired by a descending bass line he remembered from a jazz record and a "Texas loud" conversation he overheard in a bar, where a patron uttered the immortal phrase, "one of these days these boots are gonna walk all over her."

"And I go, 'Oh, that ain't bad,' " says Hazlewood. "And I've heard stuff like that all my life.... I'm a good listener as well as a talker. It's a good thing to listen."

Detours on career path

IF his teaming with Sinatra had him positioned for some kind of stardom of his own, he wasn't keen to pursue it. He says he was too busy with his production work and his LHI label, whose claim to fame was releasing the album by the International Submarine Band, Gram Parsons' first group.

Then in the early '70s he was gone, off to Sweden first, then frequently back and forth between Europe and the States. He was involved in some Swedish television movies with a director friend, but he remained musically active, performing in clubs and making records. He spent some time in the 1980s raising his daughter Samantha in Phoenix. In the '90s he joined Sinatra on a tour in the U.S. and later did his own shows around Europe.

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Wednesday January 24, 2007 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 1 inches; 55 words Type of Material: Correction
Sinatra song: A Sunday Calendar profile of musician Lee Hazlewood referred to his influence as a writer-producer on works by Nancy Sinatra, including the record "Somethin Stupid," but was unclear about his exact role in that song. The 1967 hit by Nancy and Frank Sinatra was written by Carson Parks and was produced by Hazlewood.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday January 28, 2007 Home Edition Sunday Calendar Part E Page 2 Calendar Desk 1 inches; 54 words Type of Material: Correction
Sinatra song: Last Sunday's profile of musician Lee Hazlewood referred to his influence as a writer-producer on works by Nancy Sinatra, including the record "Somethin' Stupid," but it was unclear about his exact role in that song. The 1967 hit by Nancy and Frank Sinatra was produced by Hazlewood but written by Carson Parks.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday January 28, 2007 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 1 inches; 56 words Type of Material: Correction
Sinatra song: A Jan. 21 Calendar profile of musician Lee Hazlewood referred to his influence as a writer-producer on works by Nancy Sinatra, including the record "Somethin Stupid," but was unclear about his exact role in that song. The 1967 hit by Nancy and Frank Sinatra was written by Carson Parks and was produced by Hazlewood.

Why did he leave? Sinatra says he "bolted," but Hazlewood explains that he simply wanted to spend more of his time with his lifelong circle of friends, whom he considered more interesting than his music-business friends.

"There was a hell of a lot more to life, and I did it, luckily," he says. "You go to Stockholm or you go to Berlin, you can't stay in a hotel because they'll have your stuff moved out and moved over to their house because that's where you're gonna stay. I have those kind of friends in Texas too.

"We didn't do anything very interesting. Up until they started dying 10 years ago, they loved to sit around the table, a group of us.... They'd introduce me as the only failure in the group. I enjoyed putting up with it. They took nothing I did serious."

And that's the way Hazlewood likes it -- low profile, not too serious. He does want to get the word out about "Cake or Death," though, so he's set aside his longtime policy against doing interviews.

"I just don't do 'em. I don't know, I just didn't think I was interesting," he says. "What's so interesting about writing a few songs and producing a few records?"

richard.cromelin@latimes.com

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|