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Animal control measure: a start

July 09, 2007

Re "A law for bad humans," Opinion, July 5

There are those who feel they can do anything without consequences. Having been a recipient of the messes that large canines leave on my lawn, I would be most happy to support any effort such as Assemblyman Lloyd Levine's California Healthy Pets Act. I think the penalties should be much higher than the bill allows, but it is a start. The American Kennel Club can pull its annual Long Beach show, and it will hurt only those who truly take care of their pets, not the offenders. This is the club that should be in the forefront lobbying for good manners for all pets.

JUNE DURR

Westchester

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Having been involved in animal rescue and education efforts my entire adult life, I am sick and tired of the same old absurd arguments against any attempts to regulate the behavior of those responsible. The specious arguments basically provide cover for selfish folks who just want to line their own pockets regardless of the cost to society.

There is also a public safety component to the bill, as altered animals are much less likely to roam and cause problems. The bill would also help curb the latest ridiculous trend of willy-nilly creating so-called designer dogs, purchased at high prices by clueless people who don't seem to realize they can adopt their own unique designer dog at a fraction of the cost at their local shelters.

DIANE CALKINS

Encinitas, Calif.

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I disagree with Patt Morrison's opinion on AB 1634, which would allow the state to micromanage our behavior. If almost all cats and dogs were castrated, then this would better be called the Pet Extinction Act. Here's the fix: If the animal control laws that are already on the books were enforced (and they are not), then there would be no problem.

CHARLENE T. VINCENT

Chatsworth

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Pet overpopulation is a disgraceful failure of society that lacks even a pretense of rationality. Depending on voluntary compliance with spay/neuter exhortations is insufficient. Mandatory spaying and neutering of dogs and cats, with appropriate exceptions as described in AB 1634, is the best hope to stop these excessive births from happening. Hopefully, this bill will pass and set a nationwide example for all states to emulate.

JOSEPH PASTORE

Flushing, N.Y.

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