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Immigration's many facets

June 06, 2007

Re "Not very hospitable," "Skills versus families" and "Real-life reform," editorials, June 2

Regarding Mexican workers, we have an "illegal employer" problem in this country, not an illegal immigration problem. The only reason we have so many undocumented workers in our nation is that they provide cheap labor for large companies, which enjoy greater profits and contribute to our politicians. The government should address the dog, not the tail. That these are "jobs that Americans won't do" is a false argument and has traces of bigotry. It appears that there are economic benefits to the employers, the undocumented workers and those consumers who obtain the related goods and services at lower prices. However, no one really knows the overall economic impact when also considering provision of social services to noncitizens, lost tax revenue, exported dollars and lost jobs to resident workers.

MICHAEL GOLDMAN

Woodland Hills

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We are all immigrants, with the exception of the few Native Americans we did not kill and the Mexicans whose land this was before we stole it. Why is it OK to draw a line now that our own families have come? Our agribusiness has brought migrants in as slave labor for a very long time. This bill would continue to make slave labor OK. It should not be passed. Those families who are here and have picked our crops should be made legal. Those who have sneaked across the border for a better life should be given a chance to pay a fine and move toward citizenship. All families should be kept together regardless.

LINDA SCHER-PADILLA

Los Angeles

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Nowhere do you mention how any of the so-called reforms will be enforced. It doesn't take a great thinker to know that enforcement is impossible. If a person is here illegally, "in the shadows" as the liberal media like to say, they most likely haven't paid any taxes other than sales tax; they have no record of when they entered the country; and they are most likely unable to pay the required fine. Heads of households will refuse to return to their country of origin. And the cost of putting potentially millions of people into the welfare system is staggering. It seems to me that a much better and less costly remedy would be to simply enforce the laws already enacted.

JO WETTON

Temple City

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Many politicians have expressed the fear that, if this amnesty bill is passed, in 20 years or so we will be going through this whole ordeal again. Obviously, to prevent that, they should add a rider to this bill that no one who enters the United States illegally or who willfully overstays a visa after Jan. 1, 2007, can ever become a citizen of the United States. Problem solved.

JAMES O'ROARK

Santa Barbara

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