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THE EMMYS

Moments

September 17, 2007

Jaime Pressly shows that she wears it well

Jaime Pressly huffed and puffed and worked out intensely to get her weight down so she could fit into the skimpy costumes worn by her character, Joy, on "My Name Is Earl." Then the show's writers made her character pregnant.

Wearing an uncomfortable "fat suit" on the set had its drawbacks. Not only did it cause Pressly's skin to break out and leave her drenched in sweat, but it also caused her to suffer dizzy spells. "It's kind of like feeling the way I hear that women feel in menopause," she said backstage.

Pressly went on to say how much winning an Emmy meant to her. With a golden statuette firmly in her grasp, she said, she now thinks people will see that there is much more to her than, well, a skimpy outfit.

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Rumblings that Emmy may be on the move

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Is one of L.A.'s most famous venues becoming a Shrine of showbiz past?

During the Emmy broadcast on Sunday, a spokeswoman for the show confirmed that "there have been talks" of relocating the show but added that "it's not confirmed, so there is no comment."

That sounds like the award show's future may be in play and might not include the 6,500-seat venue that first opened its doors in 1926 and in recent years underwent $15 million in renovations.

There's not much cooking at the Shrine through the end of the year, and the venue has been losing its most prestigious trophy shows. The Oscars left in 2001 for a tailor-made home at the Kodak Theatre, and the American Music Awards have just announced that with November's show they will be moving to the soon-to-open Nokia Theatre in the new downtown L.A. Live complex.

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O Canada, home of the American western

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True, Vancouver bills itself as Hollywood North, but last time we checked there was still a border in place.

So what's up with Robert Duvall? In accepting his Emmy for lead actor in a miniseries for "Broken Trail," Duvall beamed that the show's success affirms the health of the genre -- "the western is here to stay, and I'm very glad I could be a part of it" -- further noting its relevance in Hollywood and the U.S.

"I never knew an actor in my lifetime or in anyone's lifetime who didn't want to do a western. We all want to do westerns, and believe me, it belongs to us in this country, uniquely to us," Duvall said, "starting with the Blues Brothers in Calgary, going down to Texas and back up."

"Broken Trail" yielded three more statues in the movie or mini-series categories: for best mini-series, supporting actor (Thomas Haden Church) and, among creative Emmys handed out earlier, casting. Three of the five casting recipients won for their duties north of the U.S.-Canadian border.

When Duvall accepted the award for best miniseries, he gushed more about the great experience of filming this uniquely American set piece -- in Alberta, Canada.

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