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SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST

You Told Us Where To Go

August 17, 2008

SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST

We asked you to nominate your favorite vacation places in the West -- your travel touchstones, so to speak -- and you came back with a satchel full of suggestions. We sifted and sorted and chose six to explore for ourselves. Marvelous or mundane? You be the judge.

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In June, we asked you to tell us where to go. To your credit, none of you forgot your manners. But you did come up with some interesting vacation spots, from which we chose 12. Here are the six runners-up that didn't make the final list because of geography, proximity to Southern California or recent coverage. More photos and a complete list of nominations at latimes.com/tellus.

THE MINER'S COTTAGE

Jerome, Ariz.

Submitted by: Cheryl Morgan

What she said: "A delightful place to stay while visiting Jerome, the best revived ghost town of the West. Lots of art, wine tasting, entertainment and shopping. Friendly people live and work here."

IMNAHA

Eastern Oregon

Submitted by: Jane Touhey

What she said: "It is spectacularly beautiful. Wikipedia says it has a population of 12, and I think we met them all. Highly recommend the Imnaha River Inn."

MILL VALLEY, CALIF.

Marin County

Submitted by: Tony Wasserman

What he said: "It's a bit off the beaten tourist path but cute and convenient to lots of sites. One can stay downtown near the town square at the Mill Valley Inn. It's an easy drive to Mt. Tamalpais, Muir Woods, Muir and Stinson beaches, and Bolinas."

A SECRET BOX CANYON

Somewhere in Texas

Submitted by: Robert Danforth

Editor's note: One of our more intriguing entries, this one came only with map coordinates.

What he said: "The most amazing place I have ever seen. A small box canyon a couple of hundred feet deep and as wide. It is the most remarkable place I've seen."

LAVA BEDS NATIONAL MONUMENT

Tulelake, Calif.

Submitted by: Michael Everett

What he said: "Lava Beds National Monument . . . is riddled with lava tubes. When it's 90 degrees you still need a jacket. Some have year-round ice. It has a feeling of remoteness."

ANCIENT BRISTLECONE PINE FOREST

Bishop, Calif. (near Big Pine)

Submitted by: Anne Marie Novinger

What she said: "The rangers . . . know all about the trees, the science of dendrochronology (tree-ring science) and the area. There is a fine video for those who cannot hike or who want an introduction to the area."

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