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OPENINGS

Bright Future

October 25, 2008|David A. Keeps | Keeps is a Times staff writer

At his cutting-edge Brooklyn, N.Y., gallery, the Future Perfect, Dave Alhadeff helped boost such local talents as Jason Miller, the designer of trendsetting porcelain antler lighting fixtures, and vintage china recycler Sarah Cihat. On Oct. 16, he opened an in-store Future Perfect boutique at TenOverSix. Alhadeff plans to use the Beverly Boulevard site to launch collaborations with international designers and promote work by Southern Californians in addition to his Brooklyn favorites. "I've always thought the pieces we carry would fit the Los Angeles aesthetic," says Alhadeff, pictured here on Brooklynite Joel Voisard's Box Ottoman ($1,050) made from salvaged objects. Cihat's gold-fanged porcelain wolf head bust ($500) plays to Goth and Hollywood Regency enthusiasts, and a reclaimed-wood side table ($980), by the aptly named Scrapile, should appeal to the green set. The store even has glamour lighting: Lindsey Adelman's made-to-order blown glass and brass pendants and chandeliers include Birds and Bees ($3,300), shown at Alhadeff's feet. 7427 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles; (323) 330-9355; www.thefutureperfect.com.

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TRENDSPOTTING

A sleek funnel of icy lighting

Cut crystal chandeliers have never been more popular -- or ubiquitous. For those who are a bit bored with spangly danglers, Venetian designer Manuel Vivian offers a cool alternative. His Subzero line for AXO Lighting is made from Bohemian crystal cast to resemble rock that sparkles like an ice sculpture when illuminated. The collection includes sconces, ceiling fixtures and chandeliers, including a 50-light fixture that costs $55,000. The mini table lamp, shown here, is 16.6 inches tall, comes outfitted with a mirrored PVC shade and sells for $495 at Limn, 169 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles; (323) 931-6500.

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FIND

Chiming in, softly

Suspended from a heart-shaped metal frame, these tooled tribal bells from the design firm Roost in Sausalito, Calif., may be more sensible than traditional wind chimes in the season of Santa Ana winds. As decorative accents, the conical bells, which have a pleasant yoga studio jingle, are even more versatile. Hung on a gate or door, they can be rung by arriving visitors; perched on a wall, they provide a sculptural alternative to framed artwork. At $39 each, they can even be strung from the ceiling, as shown here, and grouped to form a musical room divider. Available at Living Room, 3531 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles; (323) 665-5070; www.livingroomhome.com.

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ENTERTAINING

Plates take wing

Reproduced from a set of antique Chinese dishes that are displayed at the historic Nathaniel Russell House in Charleston, S.C., this Sacred Bird and Butterfly dinnerware set costs a fraction of what the original pieces are worth. The intricate design, hand painted on white china, is a rich coral color that suits traditional and modern dining rooms. A five-piece place setting -- dinner, salad and dessert plates with matching cup and saucer -- is $285 and available at Dan Marty Design, 8687 Melrose Ave., Suite B315, West Hollywood; (310) 652-6928.

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david.keeps@latimes.com

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