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Eric Rohmer: LACMA offers a tribute to the New Wave director.

September 11, 2008|Susan King | Times Staff Writer

One of the fathers of France's New Wave -- he was editor of the seminal "Cahiers du Cinema" from 1956 to 1963 -- Eric Rohmer made his first film in 1959 and just recently completed a movie at the age of 88. Known for his wry, cerebral comedies dealing with intimate relationships and misunderstandings, Rohmer's films are a feast of clever dialogue and smart acting. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is paying homage to this master filmmaker beginning Friday with its "The Tale of Eric Rohmer" retrospective.

The tribute opens with 1969's "My Night at Maud's," his first international hit, which received Oscar nominations for original screenplay and foreign-language film, and 1982's "A Good Marriage." On tap for Saturday is his well-received 1970 comedy, "Claire's Knee," and the 1976 Cannes Grand Jury Prize winner, "The Marquise of O...," Rohmer's only film in German. www.lacma.org.

In conjunction with the Hammer Museum exhibition "Between Earth and Heaven: The Architecture of John Lautner," the UCLA Film and Television Archive explores the connection between architecture and film in its "Shoot on Site: Architecture and Film" series, beginning Friday evening at the Billy Wilder Theater with "Modern Shorts Selection by Terence Gower," as well as two documentary shorts from 1930, "Architecture D'Aujourd'hui" and "Die Neue Wohnung." Scheduled for Saturday is Bernardo Bertolucci's 1970 drama, "The Conformist," which was shot in Paris and Rome, and Joseph Losey's rarely seen 1962 drama, "Eva," set in Rome and Venice. On tap for Sunday is Jean-Luc Godard's 1963 "Contempt" and Man Ray's 1929 short, "Les Mysteres du Chateau de De." www.cinema.ucla.edu.

For those who enjoy wearing leather when watching movies, the American Cinematheque's intimate Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian kicks off its Fetish Film Series, hosted by Rick Castro of the Antebellum Art Gallery, on Friday evening with "Maitresse." Barbet Schroeder directed the controversial 1976 film that now has an NC-17 rating due to its graphic depiction of sadomasochism. Gerard Depardieu plays a burglar who falls under the spell of dominatrix Bulle Ogier.

Screening in the larger theater at the Egyptian on Friday night is a double bill of films that originally played the venerable Hollywood theater: 1937's screwball comedy "True Confession," with Carole Lombard, Fred MacMurray and John Barrymore, and the 1942 musical "The Fleet's In," which marked the last film for director (and composer) Victor Schertzinger. William Holden, Betty Hutton, Eddie Bracken and Dorothy Lamour star in this breezy wartime musical comedy. www.americancinematheque.com.

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susan.king@latimes.com

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