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William Bratton announces he will resign as LAPD chief

His decision to leave at the end of October takes Los Angeles political and police leadership by surprise. During his tenure, Bratton dramatically reshaped the force and pushed down crime rates.

August 06, 2009|Joel Rubin

* The son of an LAPD deputy chief, Beck was promoted from captain to deputy chief during Bratton's tenure. He is a popular figure with rank-and-file officers; two of Beck's three children are LAPD officers. Bratton often turned to Beck to handle controversial problems, such as the massive DNA testing backlog and errors in fingerprint analysis.

GEORGE GASCON

Position: Chief of the San Francisco Police Department

Years in the LAPD: 28

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday, August 16, 2009 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 National Desk 1 inches; 50 words Type of Material: Correction
Bratton timeline: In the Aug. 6 Section A, a timeline of Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton's tenure said that he dismissed "several commanders" after the 2007 May Day melee in MacArthur Park. In fact, two commanders departed: One was demoted and retired, the other reassigned to office work.

Age: 55

Divorced, father of two daughters

Education: Cal State Long Beach, bachelor of arts in history; Western State University College of Law, law degree

* He is a native of Cuba who fled as a child. Bratton attributes a big part of the crime reduction during his tenure to Gascon's leadership and focus on arresting the most prolific criminals. Gascon was a contender for chief in 2002. In 2006, he became police chief in Mesa, Ariz., and he was selected in June to be San Francisco's police chief.

JIM McDONNELL

Position: First assistant chief and Bratton's chief of staff

Years in the LAPD: 28

Age: 49

Married with two daughters

Education: St. Anselm College in New Hampshire, bachelor of science degree in criminal justice; USC, master's degree in public administration

* A Boston-area native, McDonnell was a contender to be chief in 2002. Bratton used a 100-page plan developed by McDonnell as a blueprint for reshaping the department. When Bratton is out of town, McDonnell often serves as chief and also is the department's liaison to council members and community leaders.

SHARON PAPA

Position: Assistant chief; heads the Office of Support Services, overseeing budget, recruitment, planning and facilities.

Years in the LAPD: 11

Previously, she worked for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's police department for 17 years.

Age: 51

Married

Education: University of Redlands, bachelor of arts degree in business management

* Papa served as chief of police for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority until it merged with the LAPD in 1997. She often appears before council committees as the department's representative. Papa was Bratton's first chief of staff, and in 2003 became the first woman to hold the rank of assistant chief.

EARL PAYSINGER

Position: Assistant chief; head of daily LAPD operations

Years in the LAPD: 32

Age: 53

Married with two sons

Education: Cal State Long Beach, bachelor of science degree in criminal justice

* Bratton first picked Paysinger to be deputy chief of the bureau that patrols South Los Angeles. He is credited with driving crime down in South L.A. while at the same time reducing tensions between the community and the Police Department.

RICHARD WINTON / Los Angeles Times

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VOICES

Response to LAPD Chief William J. Bratton's pending departure:

'He proved as chief you can get the support of the rank-and-file officers; you can get the support of the community and you can reduce crime. All those can coexist at the same time. Ultimately, fighting crime requires management skills and Bill Bratton is a good manager.'

-- Rick Caruso developer and former Police Commission president

It's a 'great loss for the city of Los Angeles. He believes in community policing, and he restored the confidence of the community in the LAPD. I watched three prior police chiefs run the LAPD, and the reality is that progress was not made until Chief Bratton became chief and imposed his will and values on the department.'

-- Ramona Ripston executive director of the ACLU of Southern California

'I'm really in shock. It's a great loss for the city and the LAPD. . . . Bratton has done an amazing job of turning around this department in the aftermath of a tortured history and really created a new department for the 21st century.'

-- John Mack Los Angeles Police Commissioner

'Crime dropped dramatically every year with Bratton. We have had some chiefs who had a good start or a good middle term, but with Bratton every year was good.'

-- Alex Alonso USC researcher and gang expert

'He was responsive to the needs of the immigrant community. We are appreciative of the decisive reaction he had to officers' misconduct during May Day and his recognition of rights of protesters. . . . Out of a really bad situation grew opportunity to do good.'

-- Angelica Salas director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles

'He came, he saw, he conquered and now it's time for him to move on.'

-- Councilwoman Janice Hahn

'I have an extraordinary leadership team. I have the best team in American policing, and I will advocate that they look to within the ranks of the LAPD for the next chief of police.'

-- Chief Bratton on his possible successor

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