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Odd hotel jobs

The coin polisher and duckmaster are here to make sure you have a memorable stay.

November 22, 2009|By Judy Mandell

"The guests here get a true hands-on experience," Keereekaew says. "It's proper . . . training: riding bareback, giving commands, feeding, bathing, learning all the rules. When you see the elephants every day, you get to know their individual ways. They have good memories and remember you. If you treat them well, they will love you forever."

Urban beekeeper

David Garcelon, executive chef at the Fairmont Royal York in Toronto, is the hotel's beekeeper. Three rooftop hives are a natural extension of the decade-old rooftop herb garden. "Our bee colonies deliver irresistible honey for our guests and, at the same time, assist with promoting our ecological commitment to bee culture," Garcelon says.

Mermaid

The Silverton Casino Lodge in Las Vegas has a 117,000-gallon aquarium in which, on Thursdays through Sundays, two mermaids take turns swimming and interacting with guests. Heather Carrasco, one of the mermaids, is a former Olympic gold medalist synchronized swimmer.

Fairy godmother

The Barnsley Gardens Resort in Adairsville, Ga., is home to a fairy godmother who, at a guest's request, can cast a "Love Spell" with candles or rose petals, Champagne and a luxurious bubble bath.

Some of her most popular spells involve candles throughout the room, parasols, Champagne, an abundance of red décor, and geisha outfits for you and your special someone or pitchers of margaritas, sombreros, cardboard mariachi band cutouts, and streamers of all colors to create a fun, vibrant atmosphere for the Fiesta No Siesta spell.

travel@latimes.com

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