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Monday NFL film review

Times NFL writer Sam Farmer sorts through the best of Monday's film.

November 24, 2009
  • Cowboys receiver Roy Williams drops a pass between Redskins defenders Andre Carter and LaRon Landry in the first half Sunday.
Cowboys receiver Roy Williams drops a pass between Redskins defenders… (Larry W. Smith / EPA )

A common postgame response to questions after NFL games is, "I have to wait to see the film." Times NFL writer Sam Farmer sorts through the best of Monday's film review:

::

Eric Mangini, Cleveland coach, suggesting the Detroit Lions might have been manipulating the clock Sunday by being less than truthful about injuries:

"There were multiple, multiple, multiple injuries throughout our no-huddle process."

::

Jim Schwartz, Lions coach, on Mangini's

assertion:

"He's way out of bounds on that. That couldn't be further from the truth. Both teams were running no huddle, and the officials did a very good job of standing over the ball, so there was

no need to do that."

::

LaRon Landry, Washington safety, on Dallas receiver Roy Williams, who appeared to hear footsteps and short-armed several passes coming his way:

"Yeah. I know he was [scared]. Y'all can quote it, too. Y'all can tell him right now, tell him I'm saying it. I can say it right now: yeah, he was scared. I told him he was scared."

::

Bill Belichick, New England Coach, to the Boston Globe, comparing the undefeated Indianapolis Colts and New Orleans Saints (this week's

opponent):

"New Orleans I'd say is a little more balanced. They're both pretty good. But New Orleans is real good on defense and they're real good in the kicking game. They have no weaknesses that I can see. They're averaging, whatever it is,

40 points a game. They look pretty good to me."

::

Vonnie Holliday, Denver defensive end, on the Broncos' loss to the Chargers:

"We had issues with personal fouls and too much jaw-jacking around. We lost composure. That's probably what is so disheartening about this loss."

::

Marcus Spears, Dallas defensive end, on a heated sideline argument between cornerback Terence Newman and secondary coach Dave Campo:

"It's football, man. When we get into these meetings today we'll be laughing and joking with each other. I don't know

if you guys have

arguments at your respectful workplaces; if you do, just understand that it's just business if you know the guy."

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