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Do claims for tinnitus supplements ring true?

The Healthy Skeptic

Studies suggest that ginkgo biloba may offer some relief, but more widely, no evidence confirms reduction or elimination of constant ringing in the ears.

April 12, 2010|By Chris Woolston | Special to the Los Angeles Times

Seidman says he recommended Tinnitus Relief Formula to his patients long before he had any connection with the company. By his estimation, about four or five patients out of 100 who try the product say that their ringing disappears completely. More than half want to keep taking the formula even though they aren't sure how well it's working, if at all. He advises a four-month trial of the tinnitus combo pack. "If it isn't helping by then, you should stop spending your money. It's probably not going to work."

William Martin, professor of otolaryngology-head neck surgery and director of the Tinnitus Clinic at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, says that there are still huge gaps in the science surrounding tinnitus. But for now, he says, there's no good evidence that any supplement helps. Martin notes that tinnitus supplements tend to come with the disclaimer that they are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease."

"I think that says it all," Martin says.

Curious about a consumer health product? Send an e-mail to health@latimes.com. Read more at latimes.com/skeptic.

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