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ANGELS FYI

Jered Weaver doesn't pitch like an All-Star, but he is one

Weaver is hit hard in loss to Oakland but is named an All-Star as a replacement for Athletics' Trevor Cahill. It's a largely ceremonial selection; both he and Cahill are ineligible to play in Tuesday's All-Star game because of a new rule. But each gets to put 'All-Star' on his resume.

July 11, 2010|By Ben Bolch

Reporting from Oakland — It felt as if it should have been the other way around.

Jered Weaver was selected as an All-Star replacement for Oakland's Trevor Cahill on the day that Cahill thoroughly outpitched Weaver.

Weaver's selection was largely ceremonial — neither he nor Cahill will be able to pitch in the All-Star game Tuesday at Angel Stadium because of a new rule — but the Angels' starter hardly looked like one of baseball's top pitchers Sunday at Oakland-Alameda Coliseum.

The Athletics rocked Weaver (8-5) for seven hits and five runs in six innings during a 5-2 victory over the Angels. Meanwhile, Cahill (9-3) held the Angels to five hits and one unearned run in seven innings on the way to his third victory in his last four starts. Cahill's earned-run average (2.94) also dipped below Weaver's (3.20).

Weaver's addition to the American League All-Star roster seemed inevitable after New York Yankees Manager Joe Girardi told reporters earlier this week that he would probably replace an ineligible pitcher with Weaver.

Oakland's public address announcer informed fans that Athletics closer Andrew Bailey had been added to the All-Star team while Weaver was warming up before the bottom of the third inning, but he made no mention of Weaver's selection.

Even by the time the game ended, Weaver had not received official word of his selection other than a few teammates' shaking his hand and offering congratulations.

"To be named an All-Star, it's kind of surreal," said Weaver, who joins Torii Hunter as the Angels' only All-Stars. "It's going to be a trip when you're surrounded by all those guys that you've looked up to for so many years. To be able to go up to them and shake their hand is going to be great.

"Some people go their careers without being in an All-Star game, and obviously for it to be at home and in front of your home crowd and to be able to line up on that line and tip your cap to the people who have supported you over the last four or five years is going to give me goose bumps, I'm sure."

Weaver and Cahill, who was named to the AL team when rosters were first announced July 4, will be confined to the dugout once the game starts Tuesday at Angel Stadium because of a rule that bars pitchers who start on the Sunday preceding the All-Star game from participating in baseball's midsummer showcase.

"It helped me out," Weaver said of the rule, which led to his first All-Star selection. "It's going to be fun to watch the home run derby, and to be in the dugout with all those guys is going to be cool."

Although Weaver collected seven strikeouts Sunday to increase his major league-leading total to 137, he is hardly on a roll entering the All-Star break, having lost his last two starts.

Weaver's All-Star selection means he will have to scrap plans to go to Napa Valley over the next few days. But at least he'll be able to order a few cases of high-end Cabernet Sauvignon with his $50,000 bonus for making the All-Star team.

Were Weaver's wine country reservations nonrefundable?

"I don't know," he said. "I'll have to check on that."

Short hops

Maicer Izturis, on the disabled list because of a strained left forearm, could resume taking batting practice as soon as Wednesday, Manager Mike Scioscia said. . . . The Angels will hold an optional workout Wednesday afternoon before opening a three-game series against Seattle on Thursday at Angel Stadium.

ben.bolch@latimes.com

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