Advertisement
(Page 2 of 2)

CHRIS DUFRESNE / ON COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Pac-10 was in a league of its own this spring and summer

Between the conference's expansion and PR efforts, and USC's NCAA sanctions, the Pacific 10 has dominated the off-season conversation in college sports. The next challenge is to maintain its high profile during the fall and winter.

July 31, 2010|Chris Dufresne

The Pac-10 is no longer a punch line.

USC's sanctions even advanced a national conversation about the insidious nature of agents.

The subject dominated recent Southeastern Conference media days after it was unearthed that unscrupulous agents might also a problem in other leagues.

Alabama Coach Nick Saban went so far as to compare agents to pimps, while SEC Commissioner Mike Slive sounded his own clarion call.

"This is a national problem that calls for a national strategy," Slive said.

Anyone have one?

Brace yourselves, though, as this off-season may have been only a preview of coming expansion distractions.

"The music has stopped . . . for now," said Scott, who still believes 16-school "super" conferences will someday dominate the landscape.

So, enjoy this, the last year of relative calm. Enjoy some alliances as we've known them.

Savor the last year of round-robin play in the Pac-10, Nebraska in the Big 12 for the last go-around and Boise State's final year in the WAC before joining the Mountain West.

Are Texas and Nebraska playing each other for the last time this season?

After 2010, will Boise State ever play Idaho again?

This is the so-far year in which the Pac-10 took college football by surprise, easily winning the off-season BCS title.

Scott: "We kind of snuck up on people."

chris.dufresne@latimes.com

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|