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Ticket demand for Lakers-Celtics' Game 7 is off the charts

StubHub.com says it is the most-sought-after NBA Finals ticket in its 10-year history. The average asking price of more than $1,100 a ticket is double what it was for last year's Lakers-Orlando Finals.

June 16, 2010|By Mark Medina

Boston forward Glen Davis stated it simply Wednesday in assessing a Lakers-Celtics NBA Finals Game 7: "This is what the NBA wants. This is what the fans want."

Included in the confirming evidence: Ticket demand and prices.

StubHub.com reported Wednesday afternoon the most demand for NBA Finals tickets in the website's 10-year year history, with the average asking price of more than $1,100 a ticket double what it was for last year's Finals between the Lakers and Orlando Magic.

Even as the Lakers faced possible elimination in Tuesday's Game 6, prices for Game 7 remained steady at $1,260 per ticket, according to FanSnap.com. When the Lakers won Game 6, FanSnap.com spokesperson Christian Anderson said the average ticket price quickly jumped to $1,562.71.

Some ticket data won't be known until the final hours before tipoff. For example, Anderson said seats in the lower bowl center court at Staples Center were ranging from $3,807 to $5,626 on Wednesday, a discrepancy he attributed to a split among individual sellers — some with tickets to shed and others who only want to sell at a maximum price.

Seatgeek.com reported an average asking price of $1,566, but the average for Game 7 tickets actually sold on the secondary market at $788. "If you're a ticket seller, you have every incentive to be as aggressive as possible," company co-founder Russ D'Souca said. "You may as well list it very high. If no one's biting, you can always take the price down."

mark.medina@latimes.com

Buy NBA Finals Game 7 tickets here


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