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Ranking the winners and losers at trade deadline

A look at the 10 teams who helped themselves and the 10 who helped themselves the least.

August 06, 2011|By Kevin Baxter
  • Koji Uehara #19 of the Texas Rangers pitches in the seventh inning during the game at Comerica Park on August 4, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The Rangers defeated the Tigers 5-2. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images
Koji Uehara #19 of the Texas Rangers pitches in the seventh inning during… (Leon Halip / Getty Images )

There were buyers and sellers at baseball's non-waiver trade deadline – and winners and losers once the deadline passed. Staff writer Kevin Baxter looks at the 10 teams who helped themselves most and the 10 who helped themselves least..

WINNERS

1. Texas: The Rangers wanted bullpen help to aid a tired rotation and they got the two best relievers to change teams in Koji Uehara (from Baltimore) and Mike Adams (San Diego).

2. Giants: The lowest-scoring offense in the N.L. added the most coveted bat on the market in Carlos Beltran (Mets) and a solid glove in infielder Orlando Cabrera (Indians).

3. Indians: Management demonstrated its faith in the struggling Tribe by getting a top-of-the-rotation arm in Ubaldo Jimenez (Rockies). But the price in prospects was steep.

4. Braves: Reacting to the Phils' acquisition of Hunter Pence, the Braves landed Pence's former Astros teammate Michael Bourn, a leadoff hitter who changes Atlanta's lineup.

5. Red Sox: The addition of Erik Bedard (Seattle) just before the deadline could prove huge now that Clay Buchholz has been transferred to the 60-day DL with a fracture in his back.

6. Pirates: They won't win the division but management stepped up anyway, filling a hole at first base with Derrek Lee (Baltimore) and in the OF with Ryan Ludwick (San Diego).

7. Phillies: Philadelphia was the best team in baseball before acquiring Pence. Now they're better because Pence will lengthen their lineup and fit nicely in right field.

8. Cardinals: They added pitchers Edwin Jackson (White Sox) and Marc Rzepcznski (Toronto) to a thin staff while dealing CF Colby Rasmus, who had become a clubhouse distraction.

9. Tigers: Detroit needed pitching help and Seattle gave it to them in the person of right-handers Doug Fister and David Pauley.

10. Blue Jays/Rockies/Mets: None of the three is in a race so they all dealt major league talent in exchange for a mother lode of prospects that could have them contending soon.

LOSERS

1. Angels: GM Tony Reagins is watching the waiver wire closely and may have something up his sleeve. He had better because the team he's trying to catch just got a lot better.

2. Reds: Is Cincinnati conceding the division? The one minor deal they made opened a roster spot for top minor league prospect Yonder Alonso.

3. Mariners: Seattle GM Jack Zduriencik rolled the dice and dealt three cheap and productive pitchers off a staff that is imploding. Only time will tell if he got enough in return.

4. Cubs: Chicago couldn't move Soriano, Zambrano or Ramirez partly because of their bloated contracts. But despite a hot market they also failed to deal Dempster, Pena or Byrd.

5. Twins: Although Minnesota has made up a lot of ground in the standings in the last two months it was the only AL Central contender that didn't make a move at the trade deadline.

6. Brewers: With Prince Fielder on his way out the door at the end of the year the Brewers are in must-win mode. But all they added at the deadline was journeyman Jerry Hairston Jr.

7. Astros: Last year the Astros gave away Roy Oswalt and Lance Berkman at the deadline. This year they dealt Bourn and Pence. I can hardly wait until next year.

8. Yankees: OK, they're already pretty good. But when the Boss was around, a pitching rotation with this many holes would have been addressed. Instead they did nothing.

9. Athletics: With its young pitching, Oakland could be a force for years to come. So it was surprising that the A's didn't move someone (Josh Willingham?) for some prospects.

10. Dodgers: They got salary relief and a prospect for Rafael Furcal then did a bit better in the three-way deal with Boston and Seattle. But Hiroki Kuroda's decision to stay was costly for Dodgers.

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