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You can feel cold if you live in a warm climate, but it may not mean what you think

January 25, 2011|By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
(Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty…)

Here's a nice winter myth-buster: Blood doesn't "thin out" when you move from a cold climate to a warm  one. So why do some who left the snow for the sun sometimes put on a sweater when it's 70 degrees outside?

"It's just a matter of getting used to the warm," said Dr. Bruce Lenes, medical director of Community Blood Centers of South Florida, in an interview with the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

But there is a connection between the climate you inhabit and your physiology (think Arctic cold and fat layers or high-altitude dwellers). Check out the full story to learn more.

So if people accuse you of being thin-blooded, you can set them straight -- after you put on a sweater.

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