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Online video a parting tribute from high school seniors

Clovis High students lip-sync to two songs and, in a single take, lead viewers around the Fresno-area campus. Nearly all parts of student life are presented.

June 16, 2011|By Emal Haidary, Los Angeles Times
  • "Livin' on a Prayer" by Bon Jovi and "Firework" by Katy Perry provide the soundtrack for the video.
"Livin' on a Prayer" by Bon Jovi and "Firework"… (YouTube )

The Clovis High School Class of 2011 has left a lasting legacy: Members made a video aimed at portraying all aspects of their school life — and featuring nearly every one of the 600 graduates.

In a lively, nearly 11-minute video posted on YouTube, the students at the school near Fresno lip-sync to two songs and lead viewers on a tour around campus. Nearly all parts of student life are presented, among them the athletes, the cheerleaders, the folklorico dancers.

The video, "Clovis High Class of 2011 Lip Dub," was notable because the students shot it silently — the other students on campus were taking state-mandated exams and the seniors couldn't distract them.

It also was shot in a single take and wasn't edited.

"We thought it would be a great way to showcase the school spirit, unity and contributions of this senior class," said Chrissy Prandini, the school's activities director. The video, she said, also paid tribute to the teachers, advisors, coaches and administrators who helped the graduates find success over the course of their educational lives.

The video has been viewed nearly 42,000 times.

"I'm really proud of the video now that it's online," said Nicole May, one of the seniors. "I'm really happy that our senior class gets to be showcased and remembered this way."

"Livin' on a Prayer" by Bon Jovi and "Firework" by Katy Perry provide the soundtrack for the video, which was conceived as a farewell recording to the school.

The students developed the project for more than two months, but they had only two days to rehearse in a gym before they started recording.

"In leadership [class], we got shown a few of these lip dub videos from other schools, and we immediately thought, 'Oh, we could do this so much better,' " May said.

She said it was the students' goal to leave something "that will always be remembered" and that helped maintain their motivation.

The video has become a symbol for unity and self-expression not only on campus but in the school district and the community as well, Prandini said.

emal.haidary@latimes.com

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