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DODGERS FYI

Kim Ng sees new job as helping her land GM job

She will leave Dodgers soon after serving as an assistant general manager with the team for nine years, going to work with Joe Torre in commissioner's office. She says ownership turmoil wasn't a factor in decision.

March 08, 2011|By Bill Shaikin
  • Kim Ng hopes her new position as a senior vice president of baseball operations for Major League Baseball will help move her closer to becoming a general manager some day.
Kim Ng hopes her new position as a senior vice president of baseball operations… (John Raoux / Associated…)

Reporting from Phoenix — Kim Ng has given up her job as an assistant general manager with the Dodgers to work in the commissioner's office, but she has not given up her dream of becoming a general manager.

"In terms of my long-term aspirations, they're still there," Ng said Tuesday. "If anything, this makes me a more well-rounded candidate."

Ng, who could become the first female general manager in the major leagues, has served as an assistant general manager for 13 years. She has had three interviews for GM positions but no jobs, and on Tuesday she was named a senior vice president of baseball operations for Major League Baseball.

Her responsibilities include international operations, including the Dominican Republic. She reports to former Dodgers manager Joe Torre, who was hired last month as executive vice president of on-field operations.

Ng noted that general managers and other club officials have been hired from the commissioner's office — most recently Sandy Alderson, the new general manager of the New York Mets. Ned Colletti, the Dodgers' general manager, said Torre had broached the possibility with him and Ng several weeks ago.

"It was something of interest to me," she said. "I finally came to the conclusion it was just a fantastic opportunity I couldn't let pass by."

She said that the Dodgers' current ownership turmoil — and the possibility that the divorce of Frank and Jamie McCourt ultimately could result in new ownership and a front-office shakeup — did not play a role in her decision.

"I have a chance to help Joe and help the commissioner change policy and impact the game in a meaningful way," Ng said. "Frank has been very good to me. Ned has been very good to me.

"This was an extremely difficult decision for me. I've been with this organization for almost half my career."

Ng interviewed for the Dodgers' GM job in 2005, but McCourt went outside the organization to hire Colletti, then the assistant general manager for the San Francisco Giants. Ng also interviewed for GM jobs with the Seattle Mariners in 2008 and San Diego Padres in 2009.

Ng joined the Dodgers in 2002, after four years as assistant GM with the New York Yankees. She stayed in that role under three Dodgers general managers: Dan Evans, Paul DePodesta and Colletti.

"It's a truly great opportunity for Kim and one that will undoubtedly broaden her experience," Colletti said. "It will put her work in front of more people. More owners will have an idea of who she is and what she does."

Ng said she would remain with the Dodgers through opening day before moving to New York for the new job. Colletti said he has not decided how to fill Ng's role.

Bench-clearing

When non-roster pitcher Roman Colon struck out Casey McGehee with the bases loaded in the fifth inning of Tuesday's 7-1 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers, Colon pumped his fist — a little too emphatically for McGehee and the Brewers in the second week of March.

Colon and McGehee barked at each other, and then Prince Fielder charged onto the field. Both benches cleared, although no punches were thrown and the sides were quickly separated.

Later, Colon and McGehee ran into each other near the clubhouses and shook hands, although Colon still wasn't sure what to make of Fielder's actions.

"I don't know what's going on with him," Colon said. "He has to let that ego go a little bit."

Fielder would not respond to Colon, by name or in any other way.

"I don't know him," Fielder said.

bill.shaikin@latimes.com

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