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Sophia Loren talks about her leading men

The actress recalls moments working with Burl Ives, Paul Newman and Charlie Chaplin.

May 04, 2011|Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
  • Sophia Loren plays opposite Marcello Mastroianni in the 1994 film "Ready to Wear."
Sophia Loren plays opposite Marcello Mastroianni in the 1994 film "Ready… (E. Georges / Miramax )

The actress recalls moments working with Burl Ives, Paul Newman and Charlie Chaplin. During an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Sophia Loren commented on some of the leading men and directors she's worked with over the years:

'Desire Under the Elms' (1958)

"It was the first movie I made [in Hollywood]. It was a very dramatic movie with Burl Ives, a beautiful actor. I had a wonderful relationship with him. The drama was a little bit like what we had in Italy. It was a very strong drama and for me at that age I was overwhelmed by doing it, but still interested in trying."

'Lady L' (1965)

"Paul Newman was a very nice person, but shy and very much in love with his wife [Joanne Woodward], who was very pregnant and always on the set. I was always amazed that each time I looked at him, I would say to myself, 'My God, I'm working with Paul Newman. God, look at his eyes, look at his mouth. He is so handsome.' I don't know when he was looking at me what he thought, but anyway, I was absolutely amazed."

'A Countess From Hong Kong' (1967)

"[Writer-director] Charlie Chaplin wanted me because he saw a picture I did with [Vittorio] De Sica, maybe it was 'Gold of Naples,' and he said 'I want this girl.' He could have given me the telephone book and I would have done it anyway. He was like a director of an orchestra with me. He would just be behind the camera in the emotional scenes telling me [via his hands] to give more or give less. Marlon Brando -- I think he had his own problems, and if your problems interfere with the whole crew it's going to be a little bit more difficult. For Charlie, it was a little bit difficult. It's a pity [it wasn't a hit]. Every time they screen the film now it gets very nice reviews because it's a little jewel."

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