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Body suit may soon enable the paralyzed to walk

An international research team announces it has taken a key step toward achieving its goal of a 'prosthetic exoskeleton' that a quadriplegic could command by brain power.

October 06, 2011|By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
  • A computer rendering depicts a monkey with a virtual upper limb. Researchers demonstrated that they could bypass the bodys complex network of nerve endings and supply the sensation of touch directly to the brains of monkeys. Doing so with humans is their next objective.
A computer rendering depicts a monkey with a virtual upper limb. Researchers… (Katie Zhuang, Duke University…)

In a busy lab at Duke University, Dr. Miguel Nicolelis is merging brain science with engineering in a bid to create something fantastical: a full-body prosthetic device that would allow those immobilized by injury to walk again.

On Wednesday, Nicolelis and an international group of collaborators declared that they had cleared a key hurdle on the path toward that goal, demonstrating they could bypass the body's complex network of nerve endings and supply the sensation of touch directly to the brains of monkeys.

Nicolelis and his collaborators — engineers, neuroscientists and physiologists from Brazil, Switzerland, Germany and the United States — are working toward an ambitious objective: On the opening day of the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament in Brazil, they hope to send a young quadriplegic striding out to midfield to open the games, suited up in the "prosthetic exoskeleton" they aim to build.

Nicolelis, a Brazilian-born physician and neuroscientist with a tinkerer's bent, calls that goal a "Brazilian moon shot." And as with moon shots of the past, his team has recruited a monkey — in fact, two female rhesus monkeys named Mango and Nectarine — to go first.

The latest experiment of the nonprofit consortium showed that electrical messages conveying sensation could be sent directly to the monkeys' brains — in enough detail that both animals could distinguish among three identical circles by virtually "feeling" their differing textures.

Those sensations did not come from the animals' fingers, but from specially coded electrical currents delivered straight to each monkey's sensory cortex by four filaments the breadth of a hair.

Although no one really knows (and the monkeys are unlikely to tell us) whether one circle felt like sandpaper and another felt as smooth as glass, Mango and Nectarine quickly learned to discern one circle from another to complete a task and get their reward: a sip of juice.

The experiment was reported Wednesday in a letter published by the journal Nature.

For a person with a spinal cord injury, sending such orchestrated bursts of electrical information to the brain could do more than allow a patient who has lost sensation to experience the pleasures of touch again. It could provide the necessary sensory feedback for the user of a prosthetic walker to navigate uneven terrain and steer clear of dangers such as hot or slippery surfaces.

The group's latest effort builds upon an earlier accomplishment, in 2003, in which monkeys learned to move a cursor to designated targets on a computer screen using thought alone.

In another experiment, first described in 2008, Nicolelis' team at Duke showed that monkeys could learn to initiate movement with their thought patterns and command a robotic device across the world in a Japanese robotics lab to walk in real time.

That development was a key step in creating a prosthetic device that could be controlled by a person incapable of voluntary movement below the neck. Now, by adding sensory feedback, the latest experiment creates a loop of command and control that could make the complex act of walking possible.

Dr. Bruce Volpe, a professor of neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College who is not involved in the consortium — which its members have dubbed the Walk Again Project — praised the latest advance. He called it a "remarkable use of sensory information" that "opens novel ... possibilities" for patients who have lost movement and sensation to injury or illness.

Following injury or stroke, patients' recoveries are often hampered by the "noisy, unresponsive or absent sensory information" making its way to their brains, said Volpe, who studies and develops interactive robotic training devices for the rehabilitation of such patients.

"These data suggest new options for generating that missing and crucially informative sensory information," he said.

The Walk Again Project is one of many research efforts aimed at restoring movement and repairing tissue in those who have suffered grievous spinal cord injury. Though much of that work has focused on the use of stem cells to regenerate nerve and muscle fiber, advances in neuroscience have made the idea of "neural prosthetics" keenly attractive.

UCLA physiologist V. Reggie Edgerton, who was not involved in Nicolelis' work but has pioneered the use of electrical stimulation to initiate movement in paralyzed patients, said that the brain's innate flexibility — its ability to take in electrical signals and learn to attach meaning to them — makes approaches like that of the Walk Again Project highly promising.

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