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Richard Neutra-designed Kronish house sells for $12.8 million

The Beverly Hills house designed by influential midcentury architect Richard Neutra was to be demolished, but a public outcry halted those plans. The buyers plan to restore the home.

October 14, 2011|By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
  • At 7,000 square feet, the Kronish House in Beverly Hills is large for Southern California Neutras.
At 7,000 square feet, the Kronish House in Beverly Hills is large for Southern… (Marc Angeles / Unlimited…)

The Richard Neutra-designed Kronish house in Beverly Hills has sold for $12.8 million. In April, the iconic residence came on the market for the first time in more than 30 years, listed at $13,995,000.

Named for its original owner, Herbert Kronish, and built in 1954, the house sits at the end of a 250-foot-long driveway on a 2-acre lot. With 6,891 square feet of living space, six bedrooms and 51/2 bathrooms, the contemporary home is the Modernist architect's largest in Southern California, according to his son, Dion Neutra. Walls of glass open to a terrace that steps down to the pool.

Neutra, considered one of the most influential midcentury architects, died in 1970 at 78.

The house became the subject of controversy when preliminary steps were taken in July to have it demolished. The public outcry over the expected demolition prompted the owners to put their plans on hold until this month and moved the Beverly Hills City Council to order its Planning Commission to craft an ordinance to protect historically significant buildings.

The buyers, who took the property in a trust and were not identified, plan to restore the home, according to listing agent Susan Smith of Hilton & Hyland, Beverly Hills. They were represented by Kurt Rappaport of Westside Estate Agency, Beverly Hills.

lauren.beale@latimes.com

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