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College housing has never looked so nice

Housing is moving away from the dorms and cracker-box apartments of old as part of a national trend. At USC, tanning beds, hot tubs, HD televisions and a club room are all on the amenities list. But it doesn't come cheaply.

September 04, 2011|Roger Vincent

Still, other students are hard-pressed to pay for school and books, let alone a lavish apartment. Over in Westwood, UCLA is racing to add more affordable housing on campus, where demand has always been high and dormitories operate on a nonprofit basis.

Residence halls for about 1,500 undergrads are under construction. Compared with the hotel-like digs of some colleges, these units are modest. Students will live as many as three to a room, share bathrooms and eat in dining halls. But the rooms will be wired for the latest electronics and built to strict environmental standards that include separate trash chutes for recycling and outdoor sun shades on the windows.

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Monday, September 05, 2011 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 News Desk 1 inches; 27 words Type of Material: Correction
Luxury student housing: A Sept. 4 Section A article on upscale college apartments said the Camino del Sol apartment complex is at UC Riverside. It is at UC Irvine.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday, September 11, 2011 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 News Desk 1 inches; 28 words Type of Material: Correction
Luxury student housing: A Sept. 4 article in Section A about upscale college apartments said the Camino del Sol apartment complex is at UC Riverside. It is at UC Irvine.

UCLA is also building 500 units of graduate student housing. These studios will have kitchenettes, contemporary furnishings and more privacy. Rent will probably be between $1,000 and $1,200 a month.

"With all the pressure coming on the tuition side, we need to be sure students have an affordable housing option to attend UCLA," said Peter Angelis, who is in charge of housing at the university. "A student's academic experience is greatly enhanced when living on campus. We are focusing our resources on building beds."

The projects will cost $347 million, which will be paid for from student housing and dining fees, Angelis said.

With a large share of the nation's student residences dating to the baby boom era, housing for their children will grow in importance as expectations and tuition fees rise, said University Gateway developer Rosenfeld.

"Given what college costs today," he said, "a lot of kids and parents are expecting more than a camp-out."

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roger.vincent@latimes.com

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