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The Morning Fix: Drama exodus stings. What will Kristen Stewart do?

August 15, 2012|By Joe Flint
  • Kristen Stewart won't reprise her role as Snow White. Or will she?
Kristen Stewart won't reprise her role as Snow White. Or will she? (Samuel Goldwyn Films )

After the coffee. Before figuring out how to put an air conditioner in French windows.

The Skinny: Has anyone else gotten multiple bills from the folks at the Department of Water and Power? Something odd is going on over there. If only I knew a reporter who could check it out. Wednesday's headlines include a look at how Hollywood workers suffer from runaway production, speculation about whether Kristen Stewart will play Snow White again and Larry King talks about why he can't retire.

Daily Dose: If you were planning to move to Denmark or Finland but have been holding back because there was no Netflix there, start packing your bags. As part of its plan to take over the world, Netflix is launching in those countries at the end of the year as well as in Norway and Sweden.

Drama dilemma. The broadcast networks have almost two dozen new dramas in the works for the upcoming TV season. Normally, that would be great news for Hollywood since a 22-episode season of drama can generate close to 1,000 jobs. But only two new dramas will be shot in L.A., a big blow to the local economy and the people who used to count on the TV industry for a living. The Los Angeles Times looks what the exodus of TV dramas has meant for the below-the-line worker bees of the industry.

Will she or won't she? When she's not busy breaking Robert Pattinson's heart, Kristen Stewart is a rising actress whose last hit was “Snow White and the Huntsman.” But will she play Snow White again? That seems to be subject to debate. The Hollywood Reporter said Stewart's been dropped from Universal Pictures' sequel. The Los Angeles Times countered that she could still reprise her role, though in either case the character of the Huntsman (played by Chris Hemsworth) will be the focus of the next movie. Either way, I probably won't see it.

Who needs the big screen? "Bachelorette," a dark comedy about three bridesmaids more interested in partying than helping the bride, is already the No. 1 movie rental on iTunes in advance of its theatrical run. Variety says it has taken in more than $500,000 since Friday from iTunes and video-on-demand rentals. The movie will launch theatrically next month on 60 screens. I may be wrong (it happens every now and then) but I think "Bachelorette" will overcome the obvious "Bridesmaids" comparisons and actually do some real business in the theater. 

Where'd everybody go? Here's a shocker. With no more Olympics, NBC saw its audience shrink by about 25 million people on Monday. It's not easy to say where they all went except it appears not too many were checking out other shows on broadcast television. A look at the first post-Olympics prime time ratings from the New York Times.

Meet the new boss. The New York Times Co. has gone overseas for a new chief executive. Mark Thompson, the former director of the BBC, will take over running the day-to-day operations for the Gray Lady. Details from the New York Post. My advice: Give all the reporters big raises to win them over! I'll be offering those same thoughts when we get our new owners too. I think it will be taken seriously. Don't you?

Mixed forecast. The Weather Channel has seen its ratings drop lately as more consumers check the Web to see if rain is coming. With that in mind, Weather Channel has been gobbling up some key properties, including the Weather Underground and Weather Central sites. Coming soon: a 30-day weather forecast. Weather Channel CEO David Kenny talks about remaking the company with the Wall Street Journal

Inside the Los Angeles Times: Larry King doesn't know how to stay retired. An appreciation of actor Ron Palillo, best known as Arnold Horshack on the 1970s hit "Welcome Back, Kotter."

Follow me on Twitter. Who else live tweets TLC's "Honey Boo Boo" for you? Twitter.com/JBFlint

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