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Viral video: Shark gives S.C. woman the shock of her life

July 12, 2012|By Rene Lynch
  • Here's an up-close look at a bull shark, circling the waters at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach.
Here's an up-close look at a bull shark, circling the waters at the… (Kevin Chang / Press-Telegram…)

A woman fishing off the back deck of a home overlooking a sleepy coastal inlet in Myrtle Beach, S.C.,  got the shock of her life when a bull shark leaped out of the murky waters and made off with her catch.

No surprise: A video of the spectacular incident has gone viral, watched more than 2.7 million times since it was posted online Tuesday. It is accompanied by some rather colorful language, so watch at your own discretion.

The only thing missing from the video shot by a hand-held camera is the "da dum, da dum, da dum" music from "Jaws." The moment where the shark breaks through the surface of the water is shocking even though you know what's coming.

Here's what happened, according to Carolina Live, which had an exclusive interview with the fisherwoman, Sarah Brame of Franklinton, N.C.

PHOTOS: Sharks and people: Too close for comfort

Brame was fishing off a deck hovering over the waters of the Cherry Grove Inlet on Tuesday afternoon, while her fiance, William Moore, also of Franklinton, captured the placid moment with his video camera. When Brame got a bite and began to reel 'er in, Moore moved in for the close-up. A friend even tried to help out with a fishing net.

That's when -- WHAM! -- seemingly out of nowhere, a bull shark shoots out of the water and chomps down on the end of her fishing line. Cue the screams. The camera jostling. And the fear.

"I was actually kind of scared because I seen it jump and actually thought it could jump up here and get me," Brame told CarolinaLive.com.

"We couldn't believe how it actually happened," Moore said. "We keep watching the video over and over and over again."

The family had no idea that the dark waters were harboring a pair of jaws attached to a body estimated to be 200 pounds and 4 to 6 feet long.

"First time we laid eyes on him. We didn't even know he was there," Sarah's stepfather, Van Hughes, told CarolinaLive.com.

CarolinaLive.com interviewed Coastal Carolina University shark expert Dan Abel, who said it wasn't all that unusual to have sharks patrolling those inlet waters for prey. In case you are wondering, many people also swim in those inlet waters.

At least they used to.

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Join Rene Lynch on Google+ and Twitter. Email: rene.lynch@latimes.com

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