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Indie Focus: 'The Color Wheel' finally rolls into theaters

After being rejected initially, Alex Ross Perry's film will open in more than 20 cities in the U.S. The filmmaker admits that the sibling bicker fest isn't easy to watch, but he hopes people will see the comedy.

June 03, 2012|By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times

Earlier this year Cinema Conservancy stepped forward to distribute the film to theaters in cities including New York, San Francisco and Portland, Ore., and less likely venues in Portland, Maine; Ogden, Utah; and Tucson.

Although Perry's certainly pleased that the film now has the chance to reach a wider audience, he was always aware that "The Color Wheel" could rub plenty of people the wrong way.

"I was definitely realistic about it," Perry said. "I wasn't like, 'Here comes a crowd-pleasing feel-good comedy.' I was very realistic about it and very aware of the movie we were making and very comfortable with presenting something that was confrontational in a way that was unusual to people and irritating in a way that's unusual to people and kind of forces you to get a little more up in arms about what you're watching. Why not?"

Perry's planned next project is called "Listen Up Philip," which draws inspiration from writers William Gaddis, Richard Yates and Jonathan Franzen. It's a story about someone who moves to the city only to be confronted by a world of "New York artistic types, phonies and deceitful hangers-on."

If that sounds like it might be familiar terrain for someone who moved to New York City to be a filmmaker, Perry added, "The script has a lot of things that are wish fulfillment in one way or another, either of success that hasn't happened or revenge that hasn't happened. There isn't a lot in it that I've actually gone through but more things that I could or perhaps am afraid that I will."

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