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Jerry Hairston Jr.'s bid to join Baseball's Hall of Shame [Video]

March 19, 2012
  • Jerry Hairston Jr. takes part in a spring training workout.
Jerry Hairston Jr. takes part in a spring training workout. (Jae C. Hong / Associated…)

Utility man Jerry Hairston Jr., who had been out over the weekend with a sore quad, is scheduled to return  against the Indians on Monday, this time as a shortstop.

Last time he was seen -- Thursday, playing third base -- he brought back memories of Mariners third baseman Lenny Randle.

It was Randle in 1981 who dropped to all fours in the Kingdome to blow on a ball dribbled down the line by the Royals' Amos Otis. Initially it was ruled a foul ball, until umpires huddled, ruled that Randle deliberately altered the course of the ball, and awarded Otis an infield single.

So here is Hairston on Thursday, coincidentally as the Dodgers were playing the Royals, when Irving Falu hit a tapper down the third-base line.

 

Hairston didn't have much lung power and gave up on his effort, as the umpire quickly called it fair.

Randle’s effort earned him a spot in “The Baseball Hall of Shame,” a book by Bruce Nash and Allan Zullo that highlights the zany side of baseball.

In the book, Randle is quoted as saying: “I didn’t blow on it. I used the power of suggestion.”

Several Dodgers also earn spots in their Hall of Shame, including:

-- Jeff Kent and J.D. Drew being thrown out on bang-bang plays at home plate against the Mets in 2006 is called by Nash and Zullo, “the most shameful baserunning fiasco in playoff history.”

-- Hall of Fame shortstop Pee Wee Reese was on first base with a walk in 1947 when Carl Furillo lost his bat on a swing. Being the considerate sort, Reese walked over to pick up the bat. Alas, without calling time. He was tagged out.

-- Manny Ramirez gets a nod for holding up a game for several minutes in 2008 because he was in the bathroom.

-- Bill Sharman for infamously being ejected in 1951 without ever actually playing in a major league game.

-- Steve Sax, naturally, gets a mention for his overexcited high-five of third base coach Joey Amalfitano after a walk-off homer in 1985 that broke Amalfitano’s thumb.

Said Sax: “I turned around and saw him jumping up and down and figured, 'Damn, he’s really excited I hit a home run.’ ”

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Jerry Hairston Jr.'s bid to join Baseball' Hall of Shame [Video]

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