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Use a credit card comparison site to pick the right rewards card

The simplest rewards cards are the cash-back cards, which rebate a portion of the purchases you make. Other types of cards earn points or miles for travel, or discounts on gas.

March 25, 2012|Liz Weston | Money Talk

Dear Liz: Should we get a rewards card? We have excellent credit scores. I'm a stay-at-home mom and my husband has a good, steady job. We spend about $6,000 a month with our debit card or automatic drafts from our checking account. I think our family should have a rewards card. My husband disagrees and says that for the amount we spend each month, we wouldn't rack up any points. Is he right? If we should get a card, how do we pick the right one?

Answer: If you're positive you'll pay your credit card bill in full every month, you would be great candidates for a rewards card.

Right now, you're passing up at least $720 in rewards annually. That assumes you'd be getting a card that rebates 1% of your purchases. With excellent credit scores, you could qualify for even richer rewards cards, since those are reserved for people with the best credit.

The simplest rewards cards are the cash-back cards, which rebate a portion of the purchases you make. Card comparison site NerdWallet recently named the Chase Freedom card as the best cash-back card with no annual fee. The card gives you a $200 sign-up bonus if you spend $500 in the first three months. All your purchases earn 1%, and you can earn a 5% rebate on certain categories of spending that change every three months.

NerdWallet also recommends American Express Blue Cash Preferred, which offers a $100 bonus if you spend $500 in the first two months. Supermarket purchases earn 6% cash back, and spending at gas stations and department stores earn 3%. Everything else earns 1%. "There is an annual fee of $75," NerdWallet.com notes, "but your rewards easily offset the cost. In fact, $25 in groceries every week is enough to make up the difference."

There are other types of rewards cards that earn points or miles for travel, or discounts on gas. You can learn more about these cards and shop for offers at NerdWallet or one of the other card comparison sites, including CardRatings.com, CreditCards.com and LowCards.com.

It's important, once you get the card, to keep track of your spending so you never accumulate a balance you can't pay in full. Always pay your account on time, since a single skipped payment can knock up to 110 points off those excellent scores.

Investing the proceeds from a home sale

Dear Liz: I am 56 and will be receiving $175,000 from the sale of a home I inherited. I do not know what to do with this money. I have been underemployed or unemployed for six years, have no retirement savings and am terrified this money will get chipped away for day-to-day expenses so that I'll have nothing to show for it. Should I invest? If so, what is relatively safe? Should I try to buy another house as an investment?

Answer: You're right to worry about wasting this windfall, because that's what often happens. A few thousand dollars here, a few thousand dollars there, and suddenly what once seemed like a vast amount of money is gone.

First, you need to talk to a tax pro to make sure there won't be a tax bill from your home sale. Then you need to use a small portion of your inheritance to hire a fee-only financial planner who can review your situation and suggest some options. You can get referrals for fee-only planners who charge by the hour from the Garrett Planning Network at http://www.garrettplanningnetwork.com.

You're closing in quickly on retirement age, and you should know that typically Social Security doesn't pay much. The average check is around $1,000 a month. This windfall can't make up for all the years you didn't save, but it could help you live a little better in retirement if properly invested.

You should read a good book on investing, such as Kathy Kristof's "Investing 101," so you can better understand the relationship between risk and reward. It's understandable that you want to keep your money safe, but investments that promise no loss of principal don't yield very much. In other words, keeping your money safe means it won't be able to grow, which in turn means your buying power will be eroded over time.

Questions may be sent to 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604 or via http://www.asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

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