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Fuel economy of cars sold in October at record level

November 06, 2012|By Jerry Hirsch
  • A gasoline pump at a Shell station in Hollywood.
A gasoline pump at a Shell station in Hollywood. (Reed Saxon /Associated…)

Americans continue to look for fuel-efficient vehicles when they go car shopping.

The average fuel economy – what is on the window sticker of a new car -- of new vehicles sold in the U.S. in October was 24.1 mpg -- the highest level yet. It was up 4 mpg, or 20%, from October 2007, according to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

The 24.1 mpg is up from 23 mpg in October a year ago and from 22.3 mpg in the same month in 2010.

Researchers at the institute said their numbers are adjusted to include the new ratings – down in most cases by 1 to 2 fewer miles per gallon depending on the vehicle – for the Hyundais and Kias that the Environmental Protection Agency found had inflated mileage ratings.

PHOTOS: Hyundai and Kias with inflated MPG claims

The agency said last week that South Korean automakers Hyundai Motor America and Kia Motors America overstated the fuel economy on nearly a million late-model vehicles. The automakers will issue owners special debit cards to reimburse the extra money they are paying for fuel.

 ALSO:

Suzuki bankruptcy
Hyundai inflates MPG claims
Upstart Tesla battles auto dealers

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