Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRooftop

New drive-in theater to open on downtown rooftop

October 12, 2012|By Richard Verrier

A new drive-in movie theater is opening atop downtown Los Angeles.

On Oct. 28, Electric Dusk Drive-In will debut on the rooftop of a parking garage at the corner of 4th Street and Broadway.

The drive-in will project a wide selection of classic films, cult favorites and contemporary blockbusters on a 24 foot by 18 foot screen, complete with carhops taking orders from a snack bar, according to a statement from Electric Dusk Drive-In.

Audio from the movie will be transmitted directly to patrons' car radios, but patrons without cars can also watch movies in a designated seating area.

The venue will feature monthly screenings and will show the classic 1980s whodunit "Clue" on its opening night on Oct. 28. Tickets cost $13 at the door, and $10 if purchased online.

New York transplants and actors Eric Heusinger and Darryl Semira are behind the venture, which replaces a previous drive-in service operated by different owners at the same location.

"Both men were eager to find work in LA that they felt passionately about, so they decided to take a chance and open a business in an industry they love: Film," the owners said in a statement.

In other exhibition industry news, Landmark Theatres, the movie theater circuit owned by Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban, said it had secured $11 million from the financial advisory firm EFA Partners to finance the chain's purchase of digital projectors. Community theaters and regional chains across the country have been scrambling to convert theaters to a digital format before studios stop delivering film prints altogether.

ALSO:

Robert Redford brings art house to L.A.

Regal and AMC unveil new distribution firm

AMC Entertainment in talks to sell to China's Wanda Group

PHOTOS AND MORE:

Iconic rock guitars and their owners

PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners

James Bond theme songs

LISTEN: James Bond songs by British artists

PHOTOS: Unfortunately timed pop meltdowns

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|