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Spoiled! Online consignment boutique keeps kids chic on the cheap [Updated]

September 14, 2012|By Susan Carpenter
  • A Dolce & Gabbana girl's T-shirt that's never been worn sells for $55 on Spoiled!, an online consignment boutique for designer children's clothes.
A Dolce & Gabbana girl's T-shirt that's never been worn… (Spoiled! )

It's the rare 8-year-old who's lucky enough to have a closet stuffed with Dolce & Gabbana, but living large while growing up has its drawbacks: What's a mom to do with all the outgrown Armani button-downs?

That's the situation CeCe Hendriks found herself in when she decided to launch Spoiled!, an online consignment boutique for designer children's clothes. Opened this week, predominately with castoffs from her son Jordan's closet, Spoiled! will be updated every Thursday with items from Gucci, True Religion, Louis Vuitton and other designers -- most of it priced at less than $200. The clothes are for children from newborn to 14 years old, for boys as well as for girls. The site currently has about 60 pieces, including a never-worn Burberry jacket for a 2-year-old selling for $120 and a pair of Size 4 True Religion denim shorts, tags still on, for $40. [Updated 9-17-12, 9:45 a.m.: The original version of this post said the Burberry jacket cost $150.]

"We got the title because my son asked me if he was spoiled. He has over 100 pairs of shoes. I was like, 'You know, kid? Yeah. You are,' " said Hendriks, who'd gotten tired of giving away her son's castoffs to friends and family, many of whom called to find out if Jordan had grown out of a coveted item.

In addition to her son's clothes, Spoiled! is also stocked with consignments from celebrities. Hendriks, 41, is a retired actor who played Erica Kane's hairstylist on the long-running TV soap opera "All My Children." Hendriks recently returned to L.A. after a three-year stint in Amsterdam with her family, where she was a socialite, she said.

"There are people on certain levels who have nowhere to take these clothes. You don't want to give them to Goodwill because you spent so much money," said Hendriks, who gives consignees 50% of the proceeds from sold items and donates 10% of her net profits to Jenesse Center, a national nonprofit domestic violence intervention and prevention organization.

Based in L.A., Hendriks picks up consignments and drops off purchases for free if the site's users live in the L.A. area. [Updated 9-17-12, 9:45 a.m.: The original version of this post said shipping outside the area cost $9.95.]

It's not about the money for Hendriks. "It's about fashion," she said. "Fashion starts in the home. There's a lot of people who feel they can't afford the Dolce and the Gucci, so this gives people who can't afford that the opportunity to be fashionable."

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