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Warriors to wear new short-sleeved uniforms against the Spurs

February 22, 2013|By Dan Loumena
  • Warriors rookie Harrison Barnes models the new Adidas short-sleeved uniform.
Warriors rookie Harrison Barnes models the new Adidas short-sleeved uniform. (Adidas / Warriors.com )

The Golden State Warriors are not only making waves with their new winning ways this season, but they'll be setting a fashion trend Friday night when they sport new short-sleeved uniforms during their game against the San Antonio Spurs.

The uniforms look similar to the new generation of workout gear, which features a lighter material that helps absorb moisture. The alternate short-sleeved uniform the Warriors will wear is made of a material that is 26% lighter than the current tank-top jerseys.

The NBA has never allowed players to wear T-shirts under their jerseys, so the short-sleeved look will be a first in league history.

"I think it will be a trend-setter," Golden State forward Harrison Barnes said. "I think it's something it will take people a little bit of time to get used to, but once they do it'll be good. As long as I'm able to shoot and move, that's all that matters."

Adidas developed the short-sleeved jersey with their adizero technology. Of course, the company is calling it the NBA's short-sleeve uniform system. What is best about the uniform? It's made from 60% recycled material.

The uniform top is made of a stretch material that moves more freely than a standard T-shirt, which can prohibit movement of the shoulders, or at least feel odd. The short pants are also made of a lighter material than current uniforms.

"It was the right moment, the right team," said Lawrence Norman, vice president of global basketball for Adidas. "Even more important, the right city. When you launch something as innovative as this, that will change the way the players look on the court and the way the fans support the team forever, why not launch it in the most innovative part of the United States?"

The only problems one can envision is a player built more like Charles Barkley than Barnes wanting a not-so-tight-fitting look.

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