Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNews

Why bisexuals stay in the closet

Only 28% of bisexuals have come out because of stereotypes in the straight and gay communities that they're sex-crazed or incapable of monogamy, a new study shows.

July 14, 2013|By Emily Alpert
  • Faith Cheltenham's 1-year-old son Storm waves a flag honoring bisexuals before heading to a Fourth of July gathering with her husband, Matt Kanninen. Faith is a bisexual activist and is vocal about the "B" being ignored in the LGBT community.
Faith Cheltenham's 1-year-old son Storm waves a flag honoring bisexuals… (Barbara Davidson, Los Angeles…)

In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual?

"One guy came up to me and said, 'You're really gay,' " said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading "Ask a Bisexual." "I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, 'That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' "

Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay — even if he had also slept with women. From women who assumed he would cheat on them. From a boyfriend who insisted Stacy was really "bi now, gay later" — and dumped him when he countered he was "bi now, bi always."

GRAPHIC: Gay marriage across the U.S.

Such attitudes appear to have kept many bisexuals in the closet. At a time when gay rights have made stunning strides, and gays and lesbians have become far more willing to come out, the vast majority of bisexuals remains closeted, a Pew Research Center survey revealed last month.

Only 28% of bisexuals said most or all of the important people in their lives knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 71% of lesbians and 77% of gay men, Pew found. The numbers were especially small among bisexual men: Only 12% said they were out to that degree, compared to one-third of bisexual women who said the same.

Closeted bisexuals told the Los Angeles Times that they had avoided coming out because they didn't want to deal with misconceptions that bisexuals were indecisive or incapable of monogamy — stereotypes that exist among straights, gays and lesbians alike.

Elizabeth, who declined to give her last name, said that when some new friends chatted about women kissing women, she just kept quiet. "I wouldn't come out to them because they would say things" — that she was "sex-crazed" or was making it up.

John, a married man who realized that he was bisexual three years ago and has told his wife, said he worries about bringing her shame if he comes out more publicly. He suspects she would hear, "Surely you must have seen the signs," and, "How do you put up with that?"

His wife has told him he must suppress his feelings. "She believes sexuality is a choice and that I can and should just 'turn it off,' " he said.

FULL COVERAGE: Prop. 8 and DOMA

The stereotypes make some reluctant to use the word, even after they come out. Laura McGinnis, communications director for the Trevor Project, an LGBT youth suicide prevention group, said she was 29 or 30 before she would readily share that she was bisexual or actively correct someone who thought otherwise.

"I hated the label because the assumption is that you're sleeping around," said McGinnis, now raising a child with her wife.

Such assumptions could make being out at work especially difficult: Only 11% of bisexual people polled by Pew said most of their closest coworkers knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 48% of gay men and 50% of lesbians.

Bisexuals were also less likely than gay men and lesbians to say their workplaces were accepting of them, Pew found. In a separate study published in the Journal of Bisexuality, half of bisexual people surveyed said their gay and straight coworkers misunderstood bisexuality.

"Bisexuals are thought to be confused, opportunistic and unable to make commitments — and those aren't the kinds of things you want to see in an employee," said Denise Penn, vice president of the American Institute of Bisexuality, a nonprofit that funds research.

Inside the gay community, bisexual people are often seen as more privileged than gays and lesbians, able to duck discrimination by entering into straight relationships.

Far more bisexuals are in relationships with people of the opposite sex than the same sex, Pew found. They are less likely than gay men and lesbians to have weathered slurs or attacks, been rejected by friends or family or treated unfairly at work, its survey showed.

Yet researchers and activists say bisexuals face another set of frustrations, sometimes shunned by the gay and lesbian community and the straight world alike.

Bisexual women complain they are leered at by straight men and rejected by some lesbians as sexual "tourists" who will abandon them for men. Bisexual men, in turn, struggle to persuade men and women alike that they aren't just gay men with one foot in the closet. Both are stereotyped as oversexed swingers who cannot be trusted.

"Women would say, 'I don't date your kind,' " said Mimi Hoang, who helped form bisexual groups in Los Angeles. Such reactions left her frustrated. "I had nothing against lesbians. I thought I could find camaraderie with people who were also sexual minorities."

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|